Article: The Dark Lady of Devon by Catherine Cavendish

Catherine Cavendish is one of my most loved authors and a great writer friend. She’s one of the most talented women gothic and horror writers working today and she’s extremely supportive of other authors and her writing friends. She lives in the UK and always offers me the best essays for my site featuring haunts from there (though she has featured some in the states too), which I always love. Enjoy her article today on a very interesting ghost, and check out all her gothic titles, recently re-released. Linden Manor, and some of her other books, are some of my favorite reads.

The Dark Lady of Devon

by Catherine Cavendish, author of Linden Manor

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“My ladye hath a sable coach,

And horses two and four;

My ladye hath a black blood-hound

That runneth on before.

My ladye’s coach hath nodding plumes,

The driver hath no head;

My ladye is an ashen white,

As one that long is dead.”

My novella – Linden Manor – features the ghost of Lady Celia Fitzmichael, about whom a scary nursery rhyme was written, which haunted my main character, Lesley Carpenter. In it, Lady Celia is never mentioned by name. Instead, she is referred to as ‘The Scottish Bride.’ And woe betide you if you laid eyes on her ‘blackened face.’

This made me research other notable hauntings by tormented brides (and women generally) and, inevitably, my path led to Devon, home of so many wonderful hauntings and folklore. Here, I found a tale which has all the hallmarks of a Daphne du Maurier dark story (OK, I know she wrote in neighbouring Cornwall, but you get my drift.) The tale of Lady Mary Howard is a dark and tragic one. Every night, her ghostly carriage and massive black dog, regularly travel sixteen miles from Okehampton Castle to Fitzford House and back again. Each time, the purpose of their journey appears to be to transport a single blade of grass.

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So who was Lady Mary? And why does she perform this repetitive ritual?

She was born Mary Fitz in 1596, only legitimate child of Sir John Fitz, a man whose inherited wealth made him too rich, too young (at age 21). He spent his money, sinking into depravity and degeneracy to Dorian Gray proportions. His wickedness eventually alienated him from the whole of Tavistock – the town near his home of Fitzford House. Then, two men were killed on the steps of his house. They included his best friend. John Fitz slid into insanity and committed suicide at the age of 30, leaving nine year old Mary alone. She was sold by King James I to the Earl of Northumberland. He married her off to his brother, Sir Allan Percy, to ensure her fortune passed to their family when Mary was just twelve years old. Her new husband was 31.

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The enforced marriage was shortlived as Percy caught a chill while on a hunting trip and died in 1611. Soon after, Mary eloped with her true love, Thomas Darcy. Tragically though, he died just a few months later. Mary had yet to celebrate her sixteenth birthday, so she was technically still the Earl’s ward. He married her off to husband number three – Sir Charles Howard, fourth son of the Earl of Suffolk. They had two children who both appear to have died in infancy. Then he too succumbed and died – of unknown causes – leaving Mary a widow for the third time at the age of just 26.

By now, tongues were wagging. That’s a lot of husbands to lose in rapid succession. Had the father lived on in his daughter? After all, didn’t Sir John Fitz become mixed up in murder at one time?

By now, perhaps as a result of her experiences at the hands of unscrupulous men, Mary had learned a little about keeping her hands firmly on her own purse-strings. She was now a wealthy and desirable widow and married husband number four – Sir Richard Grenville – who no doubt thought he was onto a good thing. He soon found out his new wife wasn’t to be taken advantage of. He didn’t like it and vented his wrath cruelly on her. Mary refused to relent, and kept her money safe.

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In the end, Sir Richard’s cruelty became too much for Mary and she sued for divorce, between 1631-32. From then on, a series of extraordinary events saw Sir Richard imprisoned for debt, his subsequent disappearance for seven years and terrible injustice heaped on Mary when he returned and a court ordered that he could seize Fitzford House and her possessions. When Mary eventually turned up there (she had been living in London), she found the mansion wrecked.

Her marriage to Grenville was the only one to produce children – a son, Richard, who died young, and two daughters, Elizabeth and Mary – neither of whom Mary had anything to do with as they served as a constant reminder of their father. She did keep one child with her though. Her son, George, born around 1634 and whose father is unknown (possibly Theophilus, Earl of Suffolk).

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As she grew older and remained, with her son, at the restored Fitzford House, Lady Mary became noted around Tavistock for her strong will and imperious temper. When her son died unexpectedly in 1671, she never recovered and died soon after. Then the legendary hauntings began.

It is said that, at dead of night, the gates of Fitzford House creak open and a massive black hound, with flaming red eyes bounds forward. Behind it rattles a coach made of bones, driven by a headless coachman. Its single passenger is a ghostly lady. Sixteen miles up the road, the coach stops at Okehampton Castle where the dog picks a single blade of grass. Back at Fitzford House, the dog lays this carefully down on a stone. Legend has it that when all the grass has been thus transported from Okehampton Castle, Lady Mary will finally be at rest.

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Now, here’s a flavour of Linden Manor:

Have you ever been so scared your soul left your body?

All her life, Lesley Carpenter has been haunted by a gruesome nursery rhyme—“The Scottish Bride”—sung to her by her great grandmother. To find out more about its origins, Lesley visits the mysterious Isobel Warrender, the current hereditary owner of Linden Manor, a grand house with centuries of murky history surrounding it.

But her visit transforms into a nightmare when Lesley sees the ghost of the Scottish bride herself, a sight that, according to the rhyme, means certain death. The secrets of the house slowly reveal themselves to Lesley, terrible secrets of murder, evil and a curse that soaks the very earth on which Linden Manor now stands. But Linden Manor has saved its most chilling secret for last.

Linden Manor has just been reissued by Crossroad Press and is available from:

Amazon

Barnes and Noble

 

Other books by Catherine Cavendish include:

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And are currently available – or soon will be – from:

Catherine Cavendish Amazon page

Catherine Cavendish Amazon page

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Catherine Cavendish lives with a long-suffering husband and ‘trainee’ black cat in North Wales. Her home is in a building dating back to the mid-18th century, which is haunted by a friendly ghost, who announces her presence by footsteps, switching lights on and strange phenomena involving the washing machine and the TV. Cat has written a number of published horror novellas, short stories, and novels, frequently reflecting her twin loves of history and horror and often containing more than a dash of the dark and Gothic. When not slaving over a hot computer, she enjoys wandering around Neolithic stone circles and visiting old haunted houses.

You can connect with her here:

Catherine Cavendish

Facebook

Goodreads

Twitter

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Daughter of a Thousand Years Gave Me My Thought-Provoking Viking Fix!

Out today (Feb. 21, 2017) is Daughter of a Thousand Years by Amalia Carosella! Check out the synopsis below and then stay to read my release day review! I really enjoyed this book!

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Daughter of a Thousand Years by Amalia Carosella

Publication Date: February 21, 2017
Lake Union Publishing
eBook & Paperback; 442 Pages

Genre: Historical Fiction/Medieval Romance

Greenland, AD 1000

More than her fiery hair marks Freydís as the daughter of Erik the Red; her hot temper and fierce pride are as formidable as her Viking father’s. And so, too, is her devotion to the great god Thor, which puts her at odds with those in power—including her own brother, the zealous Leif Eriksson. Determined to forge her own path, she defies her family’s fury and clings to her dream of sailing away to live on her own terms, with or without the support of her husband.

New Hampshire, 2016

Like her Icelandic ancestors, history professor Emma Moretti is a passionate defender of Norse mythology. But in a small town steeped in traditional values, her cultural beliefs could jeopardize both her academic career and her congressman father’s reelection. Torn between public expectation and personal identity, family and faith, she must choose which to honor and which to abandon.

In a dramatic, sweeping dual narrative that spans a millennium, two women struggle against communities determined to silence them, but neither Freydís nor Emma intends to give up without a fight.

I loved Amalia’s former Helen of Sparta series and you’ll find reviews for those books and an inteview with Amalia on my site already. However, when I heard Amalia would be publishing a book featuring one of my top favorite topics, and I’m not shy about this one – VIKINGS – I was all in! I have to say that in looking forward to it so much when I actually found time to squeeze in reading it, I was captivated.

Amalia writes Daughter of a Thousand Years in dual time periods and with two female protagonists. Emma is in the modern age of 2016, the daughter of a politician and a Catholic, and Freydis, living a thousand years earlier, is a pagan, a Thor worshipper, and the daughter of the infamous Eric the Red.

I am not the type of editoral reviewer that rehashes plots, but in this book, Amalia explores religions of the different time periods and how the women, and their family structures, dealt with them. Emma has always been interested in Viking history, but as her family expects (in most ways) perfection, Emma finally finds the courage to be true to herself when she wishes to explore the pagan religion of Thor. As Catholics, of course, her parents aren’t pleased, so she’s brave to stand up for herself. Meanwhile, a thousand years earlier, Freydis struggles to stay true to her own pagan religion and family as the wave of Christianity and converstions begins in society. Of course, we’ve read or seen these themes before…well, I have since I seek out books like this out of interest, and of course, we’ve seen this juxtaposition in history between Viking pagans and English Christianity as the Vikings began their exploring (which is viewable even on the show “Vikings,” but for some reason, it’s not getting old yet. There are still stories to be told that speak to the bravery and courage of those who believe in their own spiritual depths, as well as those who choose to align with another. Isn’t this even a common theme in society today, that people need to understand each other, and religions, to make peace with each other? I think the dual storylines really showed the fact that this issue is still strong today.

I also thought that Amalia did a wonderful job of featuring two strong and fiesty women that have many similarities even if they lived so far removed. Of course, the history section was a favorite, as it’s my first love, and she has superb historical writing. There was more background and research, and as times were tougher, I think it only served that Freydis would be a bit more animated and have more to fight through in an actual action sort of way. But I thought she wrote Emma just as well for our time period, and growing up in the now, is quite different than then! She was strong in forging her own way, even if countries and treasures and survival didn’t depend on it. Possibly her family felt their careers depended on it, but really that is nothing to what they endured so long ago. Emma showed great fortitude in becoming her own original person and not fitting the mold, which does still take bravery, especially when it means stading up to one’s parents.

As always, Amalia’s writing is beautiful and captivating. Her dialogue and character development, which her books show she always has worked hard on, continue to improve. We can see the locations, feel the characters emotions, and cheer them on in our own ways. As I mentioned her settings and descriptions are wonderful to read. I do believe the historical lean that Amalia puts on her books, as opposed to strictly historical romance, make books like Daughter of a Thousand Years stand out.

If you like to be swept away in a good historical fiction read, and like memorable reads with strong female characters, this is a good book for you to dive into eyes first. Pick this up as one of your highlights of th first half of 2017. Fans of “Vikings” should like the themes in this book and get a more unique look at women of that time period. Contemporary readers may even find their foray into historical fiction. Highly recommend – I give it 4 stars in hopes that she keeps challenging her prose.

Purchase –

Amazon

About Amalia Carosella –

03_Amalia Carosella Author (1).jpgAmalia Carosella graduated from the University of North Dakota with a bachelors degree in Classical Studies and English. An avid reader and former bookseller, she writes about old heroes and older gods. She lives with her husband in upstate New York and dreams of the day she will own goats (and maybe even a horse, too). For more information, visit her blog at www.amaliacarosella.com.

She also writes myth-steeped fantasy and paranormal romance under the name Amalia Dillin. Learn more about her other works at www.amaliadillin.com.

You can connect with Amalia Carosella on FacebookTwitterGoodreads, and Google+. Sign up for her newsletter, The Amaliad, for news and updates.

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Review: YA Mystery/Thriller Dead Girls Society a Hit with My Teen and I

Today I have a review of a teen novel! I am getting into trying more of these out with my middle daughter as she has finally reached the age of being a teen and is reading quite a bit. We’ve read Dead Girls Society by Michelle Krys and you can see our thoughts below. Stay tuned for another day sometime soon for an exclusive interview with Michelle as well.

A girl accepts a mysterious invitation to play a deadly game in this suspense-filled thriller from the author of HEXED—perfect for fans of NERVE by Jeanne Ryan and Lauren Oliver’s PANIC.

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Dead Girls Society, by Michelle Krys, Review –

Dead Girls Society by Michelle Krys is a new teen novel that Penguin Random House Delacorte Press published with advertising of for ages level of 12 – 99. I agree this is a book my 13-year-old daughter and I both enjoyed! I had a feeling with her love of the mystery within TV shows such as Pretty Little Liars, and her penchant for reading books that feature the popular “game play with humans/humanity plots” such as Hunger Games or The Maze Runner, or even more recently, in her reading of The Giver and subsequent books in the series, that she might really enjoy this. Of course this book is not really dystopian in nature as the books I listed, but was instead a more modern take on  games and dares in which teens are engaged in as a result of issues in their lives. It’s our culture today as opposed to a future humanity or made up society, which leans it all the more authentic. The suspense and mysterious aura of the novel made it quite a page tuner and is what reminded me of one of our favorite teen television shows!

When I’m not reading for content or copy editing, I breeze through reading very, very quickly. This YA plot allowed me the comfort awhile back of an enjoyable evening of entertainment. My daughter likes to be captivated by her books, and she too, had no trouble staying up to turn the pages.

I know it’s hard to write in first person, but I loved the main character Hope so much that I feel it was the perfect tense in which to write it. Her development of Hope (and such a great name for a girl with a life-threatening illness) was so layered and emotional. I felt connected with her from the start. She was a firecracker and a fighter. I admire that. Growing up with bad lungs myself, and having a son who struggles with it on and off, I was so proud of the author for choosing someone with cystic fibrosis to be the main character. People don’t realize how much people (and especially teens) have to overcome when they have breathing issues, but also with the right personality, how they can seem to sometimes overcome more odds that those who breathe well. Hope is vibrant and smart and not defined by her disease. Her strength is a great personality trait that young girls can admire. It was easy for me to see the care and concern of Hope’s mom in myself.

Of course when Hope meets the other cast of cliche-type characters (as the author humorously writes – a throw back to The Breakfast Club) she realizes that people are trapped and unhappy for a myriad of reasons. That’s an important lesson for teenagers, and maybe even adults, to learn. Our life is what we make of it and we shouldn’t be confined by any constraints. The game and the interactions made this full of twists and turns and created a gothic-type of mystery thriller perfect for a puzzle lover like myself, but yet youthful enough to be enjoyed as well by my teenager. There are some bleak moments that will delight the teen readers with a pull toward the darker themes of life and how they can be endured.

I am not much for reading romance, so while I thought the subplot romance between Hope and her best friend Ethan a way to bring light during some of the heavier times, it wasn’t what sold me on the novel; however, my daughter absolutely loves romance – the more torturous they are and can make her cry, the better. She loved the the added bit of romance to balance out the mystery.

As for Michelle’s writing, she’s a lovely writer with lots of descriptive details that make you feel like you are within the settings whether in close quarters of a bedroom or out in New Orleans. Her words flow with ease and easily help you be able to quickly move forward in the book.

Overall, this was an exciting mystery thriller to curl up with on a weekend night. Teenagers and their moms will both be enamored by a courageous character, a secret society of dark games and dares, and an ending you might not see coming.

The way the book ends, we are hoping that Michelle will be writing another book in this series, and if so, we look forward to it. 4.5 stars.

*I was given a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.*

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Dead Girls Society, Synopsis –

You are cordially invited to participate in a game of thrills and dares. Tell no one, and come alone. If you dare.

Hope is sick of everyone treating her like she’s breakable. Sure, she has cystic fibrosis (basically really bad lungs), but she’s tired of being babied by her mom and her overprotective best friend, Ethan, not to mention worrying about paying for her expensive medication and how she’s going to afford college.And she’s bored with life in her run-down New Orleans suburb.

When an invitation arrives from a mysterious group that calls itself the Society, Hope jumps at the chance for some excitement. This could be her ticket out. All she has to do is complete a few dares and she just might win some real money.

But the Society isn’t all that it seems… and soon Hope finds that playing the game isn’t a choice—it’s a requirement.

Praise for Dead Girls Society

“Dark, twisty, and thrilling.” —Danielle Paige, New York Times best-selling author of Dorothy Must Die

“A delicious and fast-paced read! This one kept me up way past my bedtime!” —Julie Murphy, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Dumplin’

Purchase

Amazon

Michelle Krys, Author Biography

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MICHELLE KRYS is the author of Hexed, Charmed, and Dead Girls Society. When she’s not writing books for teens, Michelle moonlights as a NICU nurse.

Michelle is probably not a witch, though she did belong to a witchcraft club in the fifth grade and “levitated” people in her bedroom, so that may be up for debate.

She lives in Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada, with her family.

Find more at: michellekrys.com

Follow Michelle on Facebook and Twitter.

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My First Video Interview with Historical Author Elaine Cougler

Today, I have my first ever You Tube interview of sorts! It wasn’t in person, or with me speaking in it, but I sent Elaine Cougler, historical authors of The Loyalist Legacy, my questions and she answered them in a video. It turned out great – she’s an elegant speaker and I enjoyed listening to her verbalizing her answers.

She wanted me to note that the first few seconds are a little wavering but then it picks up just fine! I really appreciate the nice words she left for me at the end of the interview as well.

Elaine is a marvelous person and wonderful writer and if you like anything surrounding the American Revolution time period, I would check her out.

Here is the video interview, click to head to You Tube: 

As mentioned previously, Elaine Cougler has written a wonderful trilogy, The Loyalist Trilogy, and the third book, The Loyalist Legacy recently released just in time for the holidays. This trilogy follows the stories of a family over generations who are Ontario-area Canadian loyalists to the Crown during the time of the American Revolution. You can read my review of the third book HERE. For the reviews and interviews previously done, scroll below.

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The Loyalist Legacy, Synopsis –

After the crushing end of the War of 1812, William and Catherine Garner find their allotted two hundred acres in Nissouri Township by following the Thames River into the wild heart of Upper Canada. On their valuable land straddling the river, dense forest, wild beasts, displaced Natives, and pesky neighbors daily challenge them. The political atmosphere laced with greed and corruption threatens to undermine all of the new settlers’ hopes and plans.

William knows he cannot take his family back to Niagara but he longs to check on his parents from whom he has heard nothing for two years. Leaving Catherine and their children, he hurries back along the Governor’s Road toward the turn-off to Fort Erie, hoping to return home in time for spring planting.

With spectacular scenes of settlers recovering from the wartime catastrophes in early Ontario, Elaine Cougler shows a different kind of battle, one of ordinary people somehow finding the inner resources to shape new lives and a new country. The Loyalist Legacy delves further into the history of the Loyalists as they begin to disagree on how to deal with the injustices of the powerful “Family Compact” and on just how loyal to Britain they want to remain.

I’ve featured Elaine many times before: you can read a review of her first book, The Loyalist’s Wife, HERE, which beings the story of John and Lucy; you can read my review of her second book, The Loyalist’s Luck, HERE, which continues their war torn story in Niagara area; you can read an interview I did with Elaine after book two came out HERE. This can all give you a great idea about this exciting trilogy if you’d not yet read any of them.

Praise for Elaine Cougler and The Loyalist Trilogy of Books –

“….absolutely fascinating….Cougler doesn’t hold back on the gritty realities of what a couple might have gone through at this time, and gives a unique view of the Revolutionary War that many might never have considered.” – Sharon’s Garden of Book Reviews.

“….an intriguing story” – A Bookish Affair

“I highly recommend this book for any student of history or anyone just looking for a wonderful story.” – Book Lovers Paradise

“Elaine’s storytelling is brave and bold.” – Oh, for the Hook of a Book

Purchase The Loyalist Legacy

BUY THE BOOK LINK –UK

BUY THE BOOK LINK –US

03_Elaine CouglerElaine Cougler, Biography

Elaine Cougler is the author of historical novels about the lives of settlers in the Thirteen Colonies who remained loyal to Britain during the American Revolution.

Cougler uses the backdrop of the conflict for page-turning fictional tales where the main characters face torn loyalties, danger and personal conflicts.

Her Loyalist trilogy: The Loyalist’s Wife, The Loyalist’s Luck and The Loyalist Legacy coming in 2016. The Inspire! Toronto International Book Fair selected The Loyalist’s Wife as a finalist in its Self-Publishing Awards. The Middlesex County Library selected the book as its choice for book club suggestions. The Writers Community of Durham Region presented Elaine with a Pay-It-Forward Award.

Elaine has led several writing workshops and has been called on to speak about the Loyalists to many groups. She writes the blog, On Becoming a Wordsmith, about the journey to publication and beyond. She lives in Woodstock with her husband. They have two grown children.

Elaine Cougler can be found on Twitter, Facebook Author Page, LinkedIn and on her blog.

VIRTUAL BOOK TOUR SCHEDULE for The Loyalist Legacy

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Review: The Loyalist Legacy by Elaine Cougler

Elaine Cougler has written a wonderful trilogy, The Loyalist Trilogy, and the third book, The Loyalist Legacy recently released just in time for the holidays. This trilogy follows the stories of a family over generations who are Ontario-area Canadian loyalists to the Crown during the time of the American Revolution. I’ve featured Elaine many times before: you can read a review of her first book, The Loyalist’s Wife, HERE, which beings the story of John and Lucy; you can read my review of her second book, The Loyalist’s Luck, HERE, which continues their war torn story in Niagara area; you can read an interview I did with Elaine after book two came out HERE. This can all give you a great idea about this exciting trilogy if you’d not yet read any of them. Here is the cover and synopsis for the third book, stay tuned below for my review!

the-loyalist-legacy_web

The Loyalist Legacy, Synopsis –

After the crushing end of the War of 1812, William and Catherine Garner find their allotted two hundred acres in Nissouri Township by following the Thames River into the wild heart of Upper Canada. On their valuable land straddling the river, dense forest, wild beasts, displaced Natives, and pesky neighbors daily challenge them. The political atmosphere laced with greed and corruption threatens to undermine all of the new settlers’ hopes and plans. William knows he cannot take his family back to Niagara but he longs to check on his parents from whom he has heard nothing for two years. Leaving Catherine and their children, he hurries back along the Governor’s Road toward the turn-off to Fort Erie, hoping to return home in time for spring planting. With spectacular scenes of settlers recovering from the wartime catastophes in early Ontario, Elaine Cougler shows a different kind of battle, one of ordinary people somehow finding the inner resources to shape new lives and a new country. The Loyalist Legacy delves further into the history of the Loyalists as they begin to disagree on how to deal with the injustices of the powerful “Family Compact” and on just how loyal to Britain they want to remain.

Review

The Loyalist Legacy, which as I noted is book three, continues on the story of the next generation – William, the son of John and Lucy Garner. William and Catherine Garner are the focus of this book (so you could conceivably start with this one and go back to book one for the back story). William and his family are living in Upper Canada after the brutality of the War of 1812. They haven’t heard from his family in two years and he’s grown increasingly concerned.

The story opens with Catherine in distress, much as A Loyalist’s Wife did many years ago with Lucy. William has left to head back to Niagara to check on his family. Catherine is left with their growing family, and work at home and in her husband’s absence, to attend to, while navigating the harsh wilds of the area and the strong political climate. It reminded me of Lucy in the first book as she was left straddling when John was away in the war. Elaine once again shines in giving the reader strong female characters and showing us the perils of many a woman at the time of such upheaval. Her women are always historical super heroes!

As well, on the other side of the coin, she constructs good male characters. I love her male characters, because though they always seem to need to leave their wives in her tales for certain reasons, they don’t like it. And when they are with their families, they are excellent family men. Life is hard and they do what they have to do, but overall, these men are compassionate, loving, and loyal to those they love. They are also fiercely wise. Those are important traits for men. I don’t think we often see men from this era being written with such empathy. They are usually pretty sterile or hated characters in history. I really love how Elaine gives us real people we can be connected to and be pulled toward – both male and female.

Once again, I love Elaine’s scenic details. I’ve learned so much about Niagara and Upper Canada during this time period from her work. I can easily visualize it from her descriptions and set a scene in my head. Being in the U.S., but just down from this area, it was really interesting to understand that much of what they were dealing with in regards to elements, war, Native Americans, etc. It’s so interesting from my perspective here in Ohio reading about how things were so similar for people in the part of the U.S. and Canada at this time, even if they had to fight for different sides. The ramifications of the war on families and cultures is evident no matter who’s side they identified on. I think Elaine’s book is so important as it’s one of few to really give us an inside glimpse at loyalists who lived Canada during the time they were made to fight in the war and the times following. I think we tend to skip over learning all of this here in America and just see all loyalists as British who came over from England to fight and then returned. Many were actually just normal pioneers and colonists as well. It’s a curious thing to actually be taught Canadian history and this series makes me want to delve into it even further.

I don’t like to give too much of the plot away in my reviews. If you’re a constant reader of my reviews you’ll notice that. I want you to enjoy the experience of all the plot points for yourself. But I will say that I do believe this is the BEST book by Elaine in this whole series. Her writing feels more free, and comfortable, in its own skin. It flows fuller and with more emotion. Her character development has more strength and her characters more complex – even John and Lucy as we’ve watched them grow over the years are more dimensional than ever. Her descriptions, as I stated previously, are nestled into all the right places and create such a visual dynamic that allow her characters to dance off the page.

After showing us the wages of war in book two, in The Loyalist’s Legacy she brings to us lives that are being pieced back together in a stymied and yet pivotal political climate that’s also ripe with change. The arrival of the “Family Compact” and this brotherhood’s opposition to democracy is explored in this book, as is the way it separated actual brothers and families in their loyalties and decisions. The meaning of the term loyalist comes into question as rebellion stirs just as new designations are being formed. Elaine explores the rebellion of 1837 which disseminated the Family Contract and the pursuit of establishing aristocracy but instead a mixed monarchy. Elaine shows how, in fact, families like those she portrays weren’t aristocracy, but people who lived off the land. We can better see through her portrayal, the alternate view of some of the situations. It was fascinating how such common people such as this family of farmers helped create such a lasting legacy on the futures of Canada, America, and Britain.

I applaud Elaine for putting together such a stellar set in The Loyalist Trilogy, and am so happy to report that The Loyalist Legacy does in fact end the trilogy in grand finale fashion. I am not ready for it to end though. As we learn so much about all of John and Lucy’s children, I wish for more stories of them as history unfolds. The Loyalist Legacy is a beacon in the historical world that shows us how common families can survive through not only the harsh climates they lived in and homesteading, but the political machinations too. I love that Elaine’s families remained first and foremost loyal and loving to each other, no matter if everything tried to tear them apart.

A beautifully written, immaculately researched, deeply descriptive novel full of heart and the true power of freedom – which only comes from within one’s own heart.  A great testament to Canadian history and to the life of the author’s ancestors.

I highly recommend!

the-loyalist-legacy_webPraise for Elaine Cougler and The Loyalist Trilogy of Books –

“….absolutely fascinating….Cougler doesn’t hold back on the gritty realities of what a couple might have gone through at this time, and gives a unique view of the Revolutionary War that many might never have considered.” – Sharon’s Garden of Book Reviews.

“….an intriguing story” – A Bookish Affair

“I highly recommend this book for any student of history or anyone just looking for a wonderful story.” – Book Lovers Paradise

“Elaine’s storytelling is brave and bold.” – Oh, for the Hook of a Book

Purchase The Loyalist Legacy

BUY THE BOOK LINK –UK

BUY THE BOOK LINK –US

03_Elaine CouglerElaine Cougler, Biography

Elaine Cougler is the author of historical novels about the lives of settlers in the Thirteen Colonies who remained loyal to Britain during the American Revolution.

Cougler uses the backdrop of the conflict for page-turning fictional tales where the main characters face torn loyalties, danger and personal conflicts.

Her Loyalist trilogy: The Loyalist’s Wife, The Loyalist’s Luck and The Loyalist Legacy coming in 2016. The Inspire! Toronto International Book Fair selected The Loyalist’s Wife as a finalist in its Self-Publishing Awards. The Middlesex County Library selected the book as its choice for book club suggestions. The Writers Community of Durham Region presented Elaine with a Pay-It-Forward Award.

Elaine has led several writing workshops and has been called on to speak about the Loyalists to many groups. She writes the blog, On Becoming a Wordsmith, about the journey to publication and beyond. She lives in Woodstock with her husband. They have two grown children.

Elaine Cougler can be found on Twitter, Facebook Author Page, LinkedIn and on her blog.

VIRTUAL BOOK TOUR SCHEDULE for The Loyalist Legacy

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