Tag Archives: Deborah Swift

Past Encounters is a Beautifully Written Novel of Relationships and Secrets Post-WWII

02_Past Encounters

Oh, what a beautiful story that Davina Blake has written in her novel, Past Encounters! I like so many genres of historical fiction, but I am always drawn to the books that feature flashbacking to WWII, with characters either telling their wartime story, or characters that tell their story while the reader gets to view how their lives unfolded after the war (whether 10 years or 40). I’m always interested in exploring the secrets someone left behind or how the psychology behind how war affected their personalities. If someone pulls out a long lost letter or photo or letters from their love who was away at war or abroad…..I’m hooked. I don’t read a lot of romance, but if I do, this is the type for me. I have a penchant for letters, long lost loves, and secrets.

Past Encounters was written after Davina was inspired by the movie “Brief Encounters” (circa 1945), which critics say is considered one of the great romances made by British film industry. It takes place surrounding a railway station, which before, during, and after the war was certainly a place of hustle and bustle during the war time era. Davina also sets part of her book here, during the flashback of her main female protagonist, and brings the filming of “Brief Encounters” into her novel. I loved how she intertwined the two, as I love old cinema too.

The secrets explored and discovered in this book are heart-wrenching and emotional, as most things are when they come down to love in a time full of turmoil. Hasty romances, marriages, loved ones gone due to war for extended periods, chance meetings, and the constant unknown of the WWII era, always allows for stories ripe with sorrow, loss, betrayal, and secrets.

From the moment I read the first part of the book, which takes us from a confused housewife in 1955 in Rhoda, then back to before and during the war with her husband Peter, his friend Archie, and his wife Helen, I was emotionally invested in finding out what happened to each of these characters between 1939 and when Peter returned from the war up to their present time of 1955. The way that she lays out the chapters and constructs the story makes it all flow together seamlessly. She was able to keep the story moving and on track, even with the use of flashbacks, making it all clear but while also able to hide her twists, turns, and secrets until the right time to unveil them. Just from the first few pages I was immediately captivated by Rhoda’s marriage plight and questions, became intrigued, and burned through the pages.

I did notice the change from Rhoda’s first person, to Peter’s part being third person, and later Helen’s; however, to me it worked, but it was a way to tell Peter and Helen’s side (a side that Rhoda couldn’t tell in present) without making him/her the star protagonist. I believe that was always Rhoda, and that ultimately, it was Rhoda’s story. I liked how she constructed it this way. It was unique, and for me, it worked.

I always enjoy Davina’s other novels, as Deborah Swift, which are more historical, but I truly loved her writing style even more in this book. She has a way with writing hauntingly beautiful prose that at first you might deem simple, but in reality, her character development and imagery are fine tuned. In this book, in this era with all its dark emotional drama, she writes as if she is penning a 1950s film. I felt as if her characters were so real, especially Rhoda, and that I knew them personally. My heart was really touched by their story, almost as if they were long lost loved grandparents. She brings an authenticity to her characters, bringing true thoughts and feelings to the surface, and even if some might not always think the choices right, they are certainly real and create depth in her characters.

I especially like lines such as:

“I could not help staring. It was as if they were from a different England altogether, one where young men didn’t die, where clothes were always new and well pressed. It was like two parakeets arriving in a world of sparrows.”

I think Davina truly is a masterful storyteller. In Past Encounters, she’s created a character-driven story that will linger on past the time when you think you’ve finished with the novel. The characters won’t leave you behind, but will haunt you. They’ll leave you wondering about all the possible true stories of this era, a time where it seemed everyone held secrets, whether from the war or in the heart.

I highly recommend this book for readers who enjoy whirlwind or intriguing romances as featured in 1950s films, emotional and gripping dramas from WWII era, and heart-wrenching tales of women and men whose past won’t stay in the past and who are tortured by love or some other emotion or secret. Davina has penned a beautifully executed novel that is a perfect read for Holiday vacation time, when you can snuggle up with a blanket and a book, becoming lost between the pages without a care for the clock.

As for me, I love railway stations. I’d like to take a trip to England, sit in the railway station with a hat and cup of tea, and read this book a second time. By chance, maybe I’d find a secret letter or hear a story or two from a passer-by. If I wasn’t already in a relationship, perhaps I’d even sit waiting for my own chance encounter.

Brief Encounters, Synopsis~

02_Past EncountersPublication Date: November 22, 2014
CreateSpace
Paperback; 442p

Genre: Historical Fiction/Literary Fiction

GoodReads Link

England 1955

The day Rhoda Middleton opens a letter from another woman, she becomes convinced her husband, Peter, is having an affair. But when Rhoda tracks the mysterious woman down, she discovers she is not Peter’s lover after all, but the wife of his best friend, Archie Foster. There is only one problem – Rhoda has never even heard of Archie Foster.

Devastated by this betrayal of trust, Rhoda tries to find out why Peter has kept this friendship a secret for so long. Her search leads her back to 1945, but as she gradually uncovers Peter’s wartime experiences she must wrestle with painful memories of her own. For Rhoda too cannot escape the ghosts of the past.

Taking us on a journey from the atmospheric filming of Brief Encounter, to the extraordinary Great March of prisoners of war through snow-bound Germany, PAST ENCOUNTERS explores themes of friendship, hope, and how in the end, it is the small things that enable love to survive.

Includes bonus material for reading groups.

Praise for Past Encounters~

“Her characters are so real that they linger in the mind long after the book is back on the shelf. Highly Recommended!” – The Historical Novels Review

Praise for Deborah Swift~!

“stellar historical fiction” -Orange Prize Nominee Ann Weisgarber

“compelling’” -Westmorland Gazette

“The past comes alive through impeccable research…and the sheer power of descriptive prose” -Lancashire Evening Post

Buy the Book~

Amazon US
Amazon UK

Author Davina Blake, Biography~

02_Deborah SiwftDavina Blake used to be a set and costume designer for theatre and TV, during which time she developed a love of research which fueled her passion for the past. She holds an MA in Creative Writing from Lancaster University and also writes successful seventeenth century historicals under the pen name Deborah Swift. ‘Her characters are so real that they linger in the mind long after the book is back on the shelf. Highly recommended.’ The Historical Novels Review

From Davina: ‘I was inspired to write Past Encounters because I live close to the railway station where the iconic “Brief Encounter” was filmed in 1945. I have often used the refreshment room that featured in the film when waiting for a train. I love a good cup of tea, preferably accompanied by a chocolate brownie!’

For more information visit Davina Blake’s website and blog. You can also find her on Twitter.

Tour Schedule: http://hfvirtualbooktours.com/pastencountersblogtour/

Hashtags: #PastEncountersBlogTour #HistoricalFiction

Twitter Tags: @hfvbt @davina_blake

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Deborah Swift Brings Legend of 17th Century Highwaywoman to Life for Both YA and AdultReaders

01_Shadow on the Highway

I do love Deborah Swift’s writing. She has a way of telling elegant, yet exciting stories based on unique individuals who are imagined to have lived around true factual people and she sets the scene amid harrowing historical circumstances while maintaining to keep most of her prose lyrical and light. Yet, though the setting is usually dire, she additionally has a wonderful way of show how commoners or the serving class, or even noblewomen, could overcome great internal strife based on external prisons. That she made sure all was present within her newest historical, also cataloged as YA, didn’t surprise and I utterly enjoyed reading SHADOW ON THE HIGHWAY.

Historically, the wealthy Lady Katherine Fanshawe did exist, though I’m certain that most people prior to picking up this book know little about her life. At least not the every day reader, though she did lead a life exciting enough to become a legend. Her seventeenth century claim to fame, though for her it was just a way out of her eternal struggle of being treated like meat and used for her money by her husband and father-in-law, was that she became a highwaywoman, known as The Wicked Lady!

Swift’s book begins as a deaf maid, Abigail (who is Swift’s main character and purely fictional), is purchased as a maidservant for the Fanshawe household. This book is set during the English Civil War, and coupled with those already difficult times, Abigail being deaf does not give her an easy road to being accepted in somewhere for work. That she is deaf as a reason to be bought as a servant doesn’t occur to her, she just knows she is cheap.

Swift’s book brings to light not only the condition of women during this period, even though independently wealth were mere pawns and treated almost like slaves themselves. However, Swift also brings to readers the realization that most of these women were so highly intelligent as to operate quite a lot behind the scenes of their awful possessive and rule-mongering  husband’s eyes. I am encouraged by how Swift always makes it a point to showcase women in dire circumstances and how they overcome them with such courage and bravery. In this instance, she has a mission and she’s also seeking love. As Abi begins to see the workings of the “games” that the men, and also her Lady, play in this life, she begins to question Katherine. I loved watching their friendship and loyalty grow.

The adventure, intrigue, suspicion, and covert operations in this book really propel this book forward. It’s a quick adult read, but I great YA novel for the fact that it would keep older teens reading and help them gain an interest in history from early on, without bogging them down with heavy political details. There are factual situations in the book that would promote further learning, such as the English Civil War, the Diggers (a movement that believed in equality for all and started the first “commune”), and the deaf and the first indication of a universal language of sign.

Swift’s Shadow on the Highway is interesting enough because it’s seeped in the legend of a woman who sneaks out at night in male clothing and robs travelers, yet it shows the woman behind the legend through her blossoming friendship with her servant girl. As both learn about themselves, and what they can accomplish, the book shows depth and their personalities complement each other in a way that makes you feel a connection yourself. The romance is not overly done, due to it being YA I was pleased by this myself, but there is enough forbidden romantic intrigue to keep the pages moving.

Swift brings layers of historical and imaginative detail to her stories and I highly recommend as a light read for any adult and for teenagers interested into foraying into historical fiction. Swift is always a must-read!

Shadow on the Highway (The Highway Trilogy, Book One), Synopsis~

01_Shadow on the HighwayPublication Date: July 15, 2014
Endeavor Press
Formats: eBook, Paperback; 200P

Series: The Highway Trilogy
Genre: Historical Fiction/YA (14+)

May 1651. England has been in the midst of a civil war for nearly ten years. The country has been torn in two, and the King is getting ready to make his last stand against Cromwell’s New Model Army.

Abigail Chaplin, a young mute girl, has lost her father to the parliamentarian cause. But with her family now in reduced circumstances, she is forced to work as a servant at a royalist household – the estate of Lady Katherine Fanshawe.

Abi is soon caught up in a web of sinister secrets which surround the Fanshawe estate. The most curious of which is the disappearance of Lady Katherine late at night.

Why are her husband’s clothes worn and muddy even though he hasn’t been home for weeks? How is she stealing out of the house late at night when her room is being guarded? And what is her involvement with the robberies being committed by the mysterious Shadow on the Highway?

Shadow On The Highway is based on the life and legend of Lady Katherine Fanshawe, the highwaywoman, sometimes known as ‘The Wicked Lady’. It is the first book in The Highway Trilogy.

Giveaway~

To win a Paperback or eBook of Shadow on the Highway please complete the Rafflecopter giveaway. Five copies of each are up for grabs. Giveaway is open internationally.

Giveaway is from Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours and ends at 11:59 p.m. on September 15th. You must be 18 or older to enter.Winner will be chosen via Rafflecopter on September 16th and notified via email. The winner has 48 hours to claim prize or new winner is chosen.

Praise for Shadow on the Highway~

“There is no greater compliment than ‘Give me more!’” – Author Susanna Gregory

“realistic dialogue, an author’s obvious love for history, and characters that leap off the pages” – Romance Reviews Today

“genuinely engrossing… with characters you can get interested in” – The Mum Website

Amazon US
Amazon UK

Deborah Swift, Biography~

02_Deborah SiwftDeborah Swift used to work in the theatre and at the BBC as a set and costume designer, before studying for an MA in Creative Writing in 2007. She lives in a beautiful area of Lancashire near the Lake District National Park.

She is the author of The Lady’s Slipper, The Gilded Lily, and A Divided Inheritance and
is a member of the Historical Writers Association, the Historical Novel Society, and the Romantic Novelists Association.

For more information, please visit Deborah’s website.

You can also find her on Facebook and Twitter.

Tour Schedule: http://hfvirtualbooktours.com/shadowonthehighwayblogtourandbookblast

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Hashtags: #ShadowontheHighwayBlogTour #ShadowontheHighwayBookBlast #HistFic

Twitter Tags: @hfvbt @SwiftStory

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A Walk Through the English Countryside with Author Deborah Swift, Talking about A Divided Inheritance

Today, I’ve interview Deborah Swift, author of A Divided Inheritance! We’ve set off on a a walk and a talk, which you can read below. If you missed my review of A Divided Inheritance, you can read it HERE. This book was fabulous and if you’re a history lover, you’ll agree.

Hello, Deborah, and Welcome to Oh, for the Hook of a Book! I hear it’s getting quite dark and dank in the English countryside, which isn’t much unlike Ohio for me right now. What are your plans for the long winter days?

Deborah: I suppose my ideal spot would be in front of our log burning stove, curled up with a good book – but it probably won’t be quite like that! I have quite a busy life and lots of hobbies so I tend to be rushing from one place to another and hours of uninterrupted reading would be a bit of a luxury!

Erin: A lovely thought, though! If it isn’t TOO cold yet, I’d say we put on our wellies and take a bit of a stroll among all those historical buildings you live near. Where should we go first? Choose and tell me a bit about it.

Deborah: OK, we’ll go just a bit up the road and take a look at Leighton Hall, which is where I held my book launch for A Divided Inheritance. If you don’t mind, I’ll bring Diver (a little terrier – one of Elspet’s dogs in A Divided Inheritance).There has been a building on that site since the 12th century, but it was rebuilt in the 18th century and now there is what looks like a Gothic castle. All the crenellated top is a façade as there is really a Georgian building underneath. Even the bit that looks like a chapel isn’t actually a chapel, it’s just made to look that way. One of the owners found the Georgian style too plain and decided to remodel it. Diver! Come back! Sorry, he’s after that rabbit, I’ll just run after him.

Erin: So cool your book launch was there, what an ideal spot! Hi, Diver….(scratches behind his ears). As we have a look see, I’ll start with some questions also! If you see something interesting, be sure to stop me and point it out!

Q:  How did you come up with your idea to write A Divided Inheritance? Is it based on real life historical people?

A: (Clipping Diver back on his lead) There are quite a few real-life people in the novel – men who studied at the fencing school in Seville, and the King of Spain, Felipe III. But these are not the main characters in the novel, my main characters are fictional. Having some real historical people in the novel helps to ground it in reality. My two main characters came from the premise that both Elspet and Zachary have in some way lost their inheritance, and in the end, despite their differences, it is their common experience of hardship that brings them together. The birth of a novel is a complex process and it was inspired by my love of crafts – like lace—making and the forging of a sword blade, along with the history of the Morisco expulsion in Seville that provided the initial starting point for the story.

A Divided Inheritance

Q:  Did you place the setting of your novel in one of the historical places surrounding your home?

A: No, although I did use Levens Hall which is nearby as the setting for one of the homes in one of my other books, The Lady’s Slipper.

Q:  Who was your favorite character to give a voice to in your novel? And why?

A: I enjoyed writing Zachary because he is a rogue, but there is a good heart underneath. His bad behaviour comes from the fact he has never known any other life than the example of his criminal elder brothers. And yes, Diver, I did enjoy writing about you too, but you’re hardly the main character. (Diver looks crestfallen) Go on then, you can have your stomach rubbed. (Diver rolls over)

Q:  What do you feel is the “hook” to your book that will pull readers in? Is your book more for entertainment or to tell a historical story that might be used for education?

A: I think the hook is that a woman whose main ambition is to take over a lace-making business finds she is actually capable of much more – that she can expand her horizons not only to learn the skill of swordsmanship along with the men, but also to leave behind her narrow world-view.

I write primarily to entertain, but like to use little-known events that might open people’s eyes to unfamiliar aspects of the past.

Q:  I know you used to be a costume or set designer for TV and film? And you’ve probably done a lot of research on the clothing of the time period. Can you explain some of it for us? Paint us a picture of what our wardrobe might have looked like?

A: Not very suitable for walking in this countryside, I’m afraid. Lots of trailing skirts to get in all this mud. We would probably have chopines (stilt-like additions to our shoes) instead of wellies, to keep ourselves above the filth. And with no synthetic fabrics we would be wearing very heavy and bulky wool cloaks with fur linings of rabbit to keep us warm. We would have to be careful our hats did not blow away by tying them down with a muslin scarf. But then we would have servants to walk the dog and assist us. (Oh dear, I shouldn’t have said that word ‘rabbit’, now Diver’s all excited again!)

Erin comments:  I don’t even know how they kept their hems clean!

Q:  I read that you always dreamed of becoming a writer. When did you first fulfill your dream and what tips do you have for aspiring authors in terms of getting through the arduous process of completion?

A: My first novel was published in 2010, and I suppose my main tip is that you have to love what you’re writing, and live the story. At the end of the day you should feel like you’ve been there. Then it doesn’t feel like work, but like a pleasure.

Q: How long does it take you to write your novels? Do you use an outline or do you free write?

A: About eighteen months, including the research. They are all quite long complex books. I use a rough outline, but it is not very detailed – a few pages of A4 paper. Then I free-write within those parameters. After the first draft I do a time-line to check that all the fiction and historical facts are meshing together before I do my subsequent drafts.

Q:  What other novels have you written and what are they about?

A: The Lady’s Slipper and The Gilded Lily. The Lady’s Slipper is a tale of one woman’s obsession with a rare orchid – an obsession that plunges her into a web of intrigue and danger. The Gilded Lily is about two sisters on the run in the glitter and glamour of Restoration London, and is about beauty, desire and ambition.

Q:  What are some of the lessons you try to teach through the writing of your novels?

A: I try to tell a good story, and let the reader decide what the lessons are for themselves.

Q:  What do you plan on writing next? Any in the works?

A: I have just finished a novel for teenagers set in the seventeenth century, based around a real character, and I am working on a novel based round Pepys’s Diary. (No, Diver, you can’t be in those books as well.)

Erin comments: I know a few here that might like to read your teen novel!

Q:  Do you have women from history that have made an impression on you?

A: I can’t fail to be impressed with Elizabeth I. She kept supreme control over the country and her court and gave us the great flowering of culture and literature such as Shakespeare.

Erin comments: Such an amazing amount of history from her time….and all that intrigue.

Q: Where can readers and writers connect with you?

A: Via twitter @swiftstory or through my website and blogs at http://www.deborahswift.com

Q:  Where can your books be purchased?

A: Bookshops if you are in the UK, and the usual online retailers if you are in the US.

Erin:  Thank you so much Deborah for your time today, best of luck to you with all your writing! I certainly enjoyed the tour and the conversation! Let’s head inside and put on a pot of tea.

Deborah: Thanks Erin, I’ve really enjoyed our walk, and I hope you don’t mind imaginary muddy paws in your house. And the good news is – I’ve brought cake! – But sorry, that’s imaginary too : (  !

Erin: No such thing as imaginary when it comes to cake! 😉
A DIVIDED INHERITANCE, Synopsis~

A Divided InheritanceUK Publication Date: October 23, 2013
Pan MacMillan
Paperback; 480p
ISBN-10: 033054344X

A family divided by fortune. A country divided by faith.
London 1609…

Elspet Leviston’s greatest ambition is to continue the success of her father Nathaniel’s lace business. But her dreams are thrown into turmoil with the arrival of her mysterious cousin Zachary Deane – who has his own designs on Leviston’s Lace.

Zachary is a dedicated swordsman with a secret past that seems to invite trouble. So Nathaniel sends him on a Grand Tour, away from the distractions of Jacobean London. Elspet believes herself to be free of her hot-headed relative but when Nathaniel dies her fortunes change dramatically. She is forced to leave her beloved home and go in search of Zachary – determined to claim back from him the inheritance that is rightfully hers.

Under the searing Spanish sun, Elspet and Zachary become locked in a battle of wills. But these are dangerous times and they are soon embroiled in the roar and sweep of something far more threatening, sending them both on an unexpected journey of discovery which finally unlocks the true meaning of family . . .

A Divided Inheritance is a breathtaking adventure set in London just after the Gunpowder Plot and in the bustling courtyards of Golden Age Seville.

Author Deborah Swift, Biography~

Deborah SwiftDeborah Swift used to work in the theatre and at the BBC as a set and costume designer, before studying for an MA in Creative Writing in 2007.

She lives in a beautiful area of Lancashire near the Lake District National Park.

She is the author of The Lady’s Slipper and is a member of the Historical Writers Association, the Historical Novel Society, and the Romantic Novelists Association.

For more information, please visit Deborah’s website. You can also find her on Facebook and Twitter.

Link to Tour Schedule: http://hfvirtualbooktours.com/adividedinheritancetour
Twitter Hashtag: #DividedInheritanceTour

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Deborah Swift Brings Historical Account of Countries Torn by Faith to her Dramatic Book, A Divided Inheritance

A Divided InheritanceDeborah Swift’s A Divided Inheritance is another wonderful period piece straight out of James I’s 1600 London. Swift does a marvelous job of setting the stage for our viewing pleasure. She sweeps details across us with visual word choices and precise vocabulary.  Her scenes are lovely to read and full of depth, life, and dimension.

Swift creates a feisty and independent female protagonist for readers right from the very start in Elspeth!  We know her sorrows, her hopes, her motivations, and her determination straight away from the very first few chapters.  And Swift builds on that further into the book as Elspeth’s strong side dominates, especially as she sets off in search of what is rightfully hers, her father’s lace business, which was passed on to her and her quick on the scene cousin, Zachary, but she knows her role as a woman partner is secondary, and her family home, gone to this man who is seemingly a stranger.

The drama that ensues as Zachary seems to be set in his own agenda of sword fighting and making merry, while she is serious about her family legacy is typical of strong female and selfish man. Zachary is sent away by her father to Spain, but then said father dies and he is left the aforementioned business in part with Elspeth, so Elspeth takes on a mission to find him.

It turns into no normal mission however, as they are thrust into Catholic Spain, which is in the stages of the Inquisition and the ousting of people of other religions, such as Muslims. Such a contrast as James I of England is Protestant and denouncing the Catholics, sending the priests into hiding and secretive actions. Zachary’s story, which shows he is actually not selfish, but loving and kind, is the key to this book in my opinion. His sacrifices and motivation to save his love, Luisa, and her family as the Moriscos (Moors) are exiled under violence from Seville, their home for many centuries.

These people had become distinctly Spanish, as Spanish as anyone who was born and raised in Spain. It was their home and to be forced away never to return, many killed or sent into slavery in Africa, was a major part of history that really isn’t talked about enough. Especially with the climate of today’s world against the Muslims, because racism is on the rise again. To be removed from your homes, your life, and to sparse an entire city due to their religious or cultural background is abhorrent. I fear we should take precautions today based on these history lessons. Swift takes a seemingly action, adventure, and family redemption story and plants important and authentic historical lessons. I thank you, Deborah, for that!!! For showing how vile it is to treat people this way, to not be peaceful enough to live in harmony with those who different, to bringing this to mainstream attention, I applaud you! The sad thing is that many were not even Muslims, but had converted to Christianity (Conversos), but that was still not tolerated for fear of treason. That’s right, it always is because of people’s fear that these acts happen. Have courage to live with each other in understanding and unity! Why should 400,000 (the estimated number displaced Muslims or Christians converted from Islam)  be cast out of the homes they worked so hard for because of someone else’s fears??

My point in all that, in regards to the book, is that I thank Deborah for bringing a sometimes touchy subject to the forefront in her book and telling their story. Her use of Zachary’s character to fall in love with one name Luisa, and courageously then helping her family, or even his dialogue with Elspeth about it, was very emotional. I wish I could say more without giving the plot away, but there are so many twists and turns in the this novel she will keep you surprised.

Swift brought me a novel that was full of women of fortitude, determination, and courage, dramatic scenes and excellent scenery, family redemption and survival, a show of unity, and great strength of plot and characters. Her historical research is authentic and absorbent. Her period details are robust and aplenty in all the right places, and her characters are vibrant and dimensional. It’s a must read for any historical history lover!

Watch for my interview with Deborah on Monday, Nov. 25!

A DIVIDED INHERITANCE, Synopsis~

A Divided InheritanceUK Publication Date: October 23, 2013
Pan MacMillan
Paperback; 480p
ISBN-10: 033054344X

A family divided by fortune. A country divided by faith.

London 1609…

Elspet Leviston’s greatest ambition is to continue the success of her father  Nathaniel’s lace business. But her dreams are thrown into turmoil with  the arrival of her mysterious cousin Zachary Deane – who has his own  designs on Leviston’s Lace.

Zachary is a dedicated swordsman with a secret past that seems to  invite trouble. So Nathaniel sends him on a Grand Tour, away from the  distractions of Jacobean London. Elspet believes herself to be free of  her hot-headed relative but when Nathaniel dies her fortunes change  dramatically. She is forced to leave her beloved home and go in search  of Zachary – determined to claim back from him the inheritance that is  rightfully hers.

Under the searing Spanish sun, Elspet and Zachary become locked in a battle of wills. But these are dangerous times and they are soon  embroiled in the roar and sweep of something far more threatening,  sending them both on an unexpected journey of discovery which finally  unlocks the true meaning of family . . .

A Divided Inheritance is a breathtaking adventure set in London  just after the Gunpowder Plot and in the bustling courtyards of Golden  Age Seville.

Author Deborah Swift, Biography~

Deborah SwiftDeborah Swift used to work in the theatre and at the BBC as a set and costume  designer, before studying for an MA in Creative Writing in 2007. She  lives in a beautiful area of Lancashire near the Lake District National  Park.  She is the author of The Lady’s Slipper and is a member of the  Historical Writers Association, the Historical Novel Society, and the  Romantic Novelists Association.

For more information, please visit Deborah’s website. You can also find her on Facebook and Twitter.

Link to Tour Schedule: http://hfvirtualbooktours.com/adividedinheritancetour
Twitter Hashtag: #DividedInheritanceTour

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