Tag Archives: gothic horror

Guest Article: Catherine Cavendish on the Curse of Gleichenberg Castle

Today, I have a guest article for you to read that I think will really spook you! Author Catherine Cavendish will usually do that to you. She’s one of my favorite horror, and especially Gothic horror, authors working today. Her talent shines through in her work and she always writes cool guest articles to coincide with her releases. On Tuesday, the second stand alone book in her Nemesis of the Gods trilogy, Waking the Ancients, will release from Kensington Lyrical Underground. Congratulations, Cat! Readers – definitely check this one out soon – until then, enjoy the article….

The Curse – and Miracle – of Gleichenberg Castle

by Catherine Cavendish, author of Waking the Ancients

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I have set a large part of Waking the Ancients in Vienna, Austria where many ghosts and restless spirits walk among the verdant parks and lavish palaces. But Austrian ghosts do not confine themselves to their nation’s imperial capital. They can be found in towns, cities, villages and the depths of the countryside all over this beautiful land.

Deep in the heart of the picturesque province of Styria, stands the 14th century fortress of Gleichenberg castle which has been the home of Trauttmansdorff family and their descendants throughout its long and troubled history. Legends abound of miracles and terrible curses from within its walls.

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In fact the name Trauttmansdorff might have died out altogether centuries ago when the sole heir—young son of the then Count—lay dying of lung disease. It so happened that a gypsy came to the Count’s court and revealed the location of a hidden spring. Its water had healing properties, the gypsy claimed and, his doctor shaving failed him, the count was desperate for any chance of saving his son. He uncovered the spring and gave the boy water to drink from it. The boy recovered and grew up strong and healthy. Needless to say, the Count rewarded the gypsy well for his services and, over the years, the spring became famous for its miraculous healing powers.

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Things did not go so well for a later Count Trauttmansdorff who was forced, by the Catholic hierarchy, to find twenty local women guilty of witchcraft. He was ordered to have them executed—the usual punishment for such a crime. Before they died however, they all issued a curse against his family that has resonated down through the centuries.  This was at the time of the wars with Turkish invaders who murdered all twenty one of the Count’s sons and nephews, delivering their lifeless, bloody bodies to the Countess. Understandably she became hysterical and never recovered her senses.

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The curse didn’t stop there though. Phantoms and poltergeists scared workers and others away from the Count’s estate. Windows at the castle shattered, doors slammed for no reasons and loud crashing sounds, for which no cause could be traced, echoed down the dark hallways at night. A family member dug up the twenty skeletons of the executed supposed witches and reburied them in the forest, covering the site with concrete. He might as well not have bothered. Fires started in so many parts of the castle that the interior was destroyed. Soon nothing remained but burned out timbers

Now, the castle lies in ruins. The witches’ curse has been fulfilled. Are they satisfied? Do they rest in peace? The current owner, Countess Annie, lives in a charming house where she can look up at the ruins of her ancestral home, its broken walls reaching up into the sky like skeletal fingers. It was her father who tried to rid the castle of its curse by reburying the skeletons. She is utterly convinced of the malignity that continues to reside there. People have knocked on her door, complaining of unseen children throwing stones down at them from the castle. But there are no children there.

Is the continuing activity still down to the witches – or is there another, more evil force at work? Countess Annie is adamant. Whatever is there has taken over. And it means harm to any who cross its path.

Visitors to the area are advised to keep well away from the ground at night. Defy this and you might well find yourself with some unwelcome company…

Of course, Dr. Emeryk Quintillus knows all about unwelcome company…

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Waking the Ancients

Legacy In Death

Egypt, 1908

University student Lizzie Charters accompanies her mentor, Dr. Emeryk Quintillus, on the archeological dig to uncover Cleopatra’s tomb. Her presence is required for a ceremony conducted by the renowned professor to resurrect Cleopatra’s spirit—inside Lizzie’s body. Quintillus’s success is short-lived, as the Queen of the Nile dies soon after inhabiting her host, leaving Lizzie’s soul adrift . . .

Vienna, 2018

Paula Bancroft’s husband just leased Villa Dürnstein, an estate once owned by Dr. Quintillus. Within the mansion are several paintings and numerous volumes dedicated to Cleopatra. But the archeologist’s interest in the Egyptian empress deviated from scholarly into supernatural, infusing the very foundations of his home with his dark fanaticism. And as inexplicable manifestations rattle Paula’s senses, threatening her very sanity, she uncovers the link between the villa, Quintillus, and a woman named Lizzie Charters.

And a ritual of dark magic that will consume her soul . . .

You can find Waking the Ancients here –

Kensington Press

Amazon

Barnes and Noble

Apple

Google

Kobo

Catherine Cavendish, Biography –

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Following a varied career in sales, advertising and career guidance, Catherine Cavendish is now the full-time author of a number of paranormal, ghostly and Gothic horror novels, novellas and short stories.

Cat’s novels include the Nemesis of the Gods trilogy – Wrath of the Ancients, Waking the Ancients and Damned by the Ancients, plus The Devil’s Serenade, The Pendle Curse and Saving Grace Devine.

She lives with her long-suffering husband, and a black cat who has never forgotten that her species used to be worshipped in ancient Egypt. She sees no reason why that practice should not continue. Cat and her family divide their time between Liverpool and a 260-year-old haunted apartment in North Wales.

You can connect with Cat here –

Catherine Cavendish

Facebook

Twitter

Goodreads

Thank you, Cat, for a great article!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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#HookonWiH: Author D.R. Bartlette Interviews Irish Author Emma Ennis

Today in the #HookonWiH series, author D.R. Bartlette interviews Irish author Emma Ennis! This is a fabulous interview that I really enjoyed so I hope you do too! D.R. is one motivated lady and I’ve been happy to meet her on Twitter. I look forward to reading her stuff. Not knowing of Emma at all before this, I’m really glad I was introduced through this interview, we have a lot of similar writing and book interests. I mean, Gothic?!

I had been taking interviews by men and women with women in horror, as well as guest articles, throughout the month of February, but I have quite a few still set to post and so I decided to take them all year long. You can find information on this at the bottom of the post. Thank you D.R. Bartlette for the interview!

D – When did you start writing horror?

E – I’ve been watching horror since I was about 5, reading it from a little older. As a consequence I dream a lot, which I consider writing in a way. Writing on my subconscious. Many of my dreams have become stories, and some of my happiest mornings follow one of my epic zombie dreams.

That’s all well and waxy and poetic, says you, but when did you actually first put horror to page? 2009. It was a short story called “Come On In.” People loved it. Said it was chilling. It is one of the stories in my collection, Red Wine and Words. I’d been writing a lot longer than 2009 though, unsuccessfully so, and not horror.

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D – What is it about horror that inspires you (i.e. why horror)?

E – I love the thrill of fear. And by fear I don’t mean the kind where you watch all your loved ones die off around you of some terminal disease. The other kind. The kind that makes a girl with a deathly aversion to heights go do a bungee jump.

Mystery and the unexplained give me the same kind of thrill. I don’t really like horror that’s all neatly wrapped up and tied with a bow in the end. I prefer questions and what-ifs. Monsters don’t scare me; monsters can be killed. It’s psychological horror that bakes my bikkies.

I read a story once in a big-ass anthology of creepy stories. It was a long time ago but the gist is that this man had come to take in a young boy after his sister died. The child was seriously messed up in that he wouldn’t come out of hiding or eat for anyone. I think he starved in the end. Anyway, through the course of the story somehow, it came to light that the mother had resented the little boy because her husband had drowned saving him. So she set out to make the child depend completely, utterly and solely on her. She painted his room with glow in the dark figures to terrify him at night, even playing scary noises at from a gramophone hidden in a panel in the wardrobe. There were lots of other twisted things I can’t remember, but in the end, when the child could not live without her, she killed herself.

The story knocked my socks off. It messed with my mind while highlighting how psychology can be used to mess with people’s minds! And it made me want to mess with other people’s minds, thrill them like I’d been thrilled.

D – Who are your inspirations?

E – The latest  and greats: Conan Doyle, Poe, Oscar Wilde, Bram Stoker. I love that Gothic feel to horror. Wuthering Heights, The Woman in Black, The Haunting of Hill House, even Jane Eyre was a bit creepy. I wrote a book a few years back that should be released any day now – Walls of Grey, Veins of Stone. Turns out it’s a textbook Gothic horror. Whoodathunkit?

It’s not only books that inspire me. Movies and games do too. In the latter category sit Silent Hill and Resident Evil. In the former there are too many to name, but I would eat up anything by Guillermo del Toro or Joss Whedon. I’m also liking what the Justin Benson/Aaron Moorehead duo are doing – weird, unexplained, but with feels. Kinda reminds me of what goes on in my own head much of any given day.

D – Do you think being a woman brings a different perspective to your storytelling? How?

E – I was recently told by a man who knows his shit, that women write emotion and feelings better than men. I see that. I see that some men have difficulty in showing women’s emotions, and who could blame them? How on earth could you go about unpacking all that if you’ve never experienced it first hand? I would like to say that women tell love stories better than men, but then I remember Joss Whedon and I realise I’d be talking out of my arse if I did say that.

At the end of the day though, male and female are different perspectives. In all walks of life, language, emotion, science. You could have a predominately masculine female who can tell a war story better than a veteran, or a feminine male who’ll write a love story to rival The Notebook. By feminine male and vice versa I don’t mean camp, or butch, and I’m not talking about body shape. But men or women who have a strong connection with the opposite side of their nature.

That got awfully technical, didn’t it? To simplify, I think every writer, whether male, female, child or geriatric, human or greyman, brings a new, different perspective to the world of stories. Demographics bedamned; that’s fake news.

D – Do you have certain themes or motifs that are common in your stories? Why?

E – Love and loss. Darkness. Psychological shenanigans. My stories are usually left quite open. As I said, I’m not fond of plots that end neatly and tied up with a bow. You know the ones – boy gets the girl, girl gets the boy, killer behind bars, detective gets a promotion and a big fat pay rise. Shiver. Happy happy endings make me feel dirty.

I think those stories which are not so clear-cut at the end and leave some questions unanswered tend to stay with us longer. And that’s what I want. I want people to remember my work days, months, years after they’ve finished reading it. So far I’ve had a lot of reports saying I have achieved this with my writing. This pleases me. This is essential my master plan.

Emma Ennis, Biography – 

G27658858_10210555769321702_368162432_nrowing up with siblings who were old enough to have stacks of books & movies Emma really should not have been reading or watching, it was inevitable that things would get mildly deranged in the old noggin. Writing gave the crazy somewhere to go.

 Now, not even an apocalypse will induce her to stop. In fact, when it comes she’ll most likely write about it. Her second obsession being movies, in 2016 she got tired of waiting around for Guillermo del Toro to find one of her books, & started writing her own films. When asked to comment on this she said, ‘You’re welcome’.

Emma lives in Wexford, Ireland, where she indulges freely & copiously in her third & fourth obsessions: cats & red wine. You can find out more about her and her books on her website.

Thanks to D.R. Bartlette for her interview with Emma!

D.R. Bartlette, Biography –

DRBphotoD.R. Bartlette is a Southern author who writes smart, dark fiction. A nerdy weirdo who hung out in libraries for fun, she discovered horror at an inappropriately early age, and her mind has been twisted ever since.
She wrote her first short horror story in eighth grade. Since then, she’s written dozens of short stories, articles, and essays from topics ranging from school lunches to the study of human decomposition.
Her first novel, The Devil in Black Creek, is set in 1986, when 12-year-old Cassie discovers an unspeakable secret in the local preacher’s shed.
She lives and writes in her hometown of Fayetteville, Arkansas, where she still hangs out at the library for fun. Visit her at her website.

Watch for more to come in the #HookonWiH series….

February was Women in Horror Month (#HookonWiHM) but now we are honoring them all year! It’s time to celebrate and show off what we got! For those of you reading, men AND women both, make an effort to read and watch more horror produced by women this year.

For the #HookonWiH series, or Women in Horror at Hook of a Book, we’ll be hosting interviews conducted by men and women with other women in horror. Watch for those spread throughout the month, and if you want in, contact me! Find more info HERE.

WiHM9-GrrrlLogoWide-BR-website

 

 

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Jonathan Janz STEALS My Blog Today! Get the Word on His New Ghost Story!

Today, we’ve got a guest post by the jovial Jonathan Janz, a horror author who is only slightly mad. But I’ll let him post anyway because he makes me laugh and I like his work. Today he’ll be talking about his upcoming House of Skin.

Ok, guest post starts here…………take it away Jonathan:

First of all, a huge thank you to Erin for allowing me to commandeer her blog for the day. And thank you to my doctors for letting me out of my cage. 

My new novel is called HOUSE OF SKIN. Here’s the incredible cover and a brief description of the tale: 

 

“Myles Carver is dead. But his estate, Watermere, lives on, waiting for a new Carver to move in. Myles’s wife, Annabel, is dead too, but she is also waiting, lying in her grave in the woods. For nearly half a century she was responsible for a nightmarish reign of terror, and she’s not prepared to stop now. She is hungry to live again…and her unsuspecting nephew, Paul, will be the key.

Julia Merrow has a secret almost as dark as Watermere’s. But when she and Paul fall in love they think their problems might be over. How can they know what Fate—and Annabel—have in store for them? Who could imagine that what was once a moldering corpse in a forest grave is growing stronger every day, eager to take her rightful place amongst the horrors of Watermere?”

So that’s the skeleton plot of the book. What I wanted to do today was to give you a glimpse into the novel via a short excerpt. The passage I’ve chosen to share with you today is the moment in which Paul Carver first enters his newly inherited Victorianmansion. Any of you who’ve ever bought (or inherited) a home can probably relate to the anticipation Paul is feeling here. So read on after the photo of MY BETTER SIDE for some free fiction!

When Paul came to an opening in the forest, he made out a wooden mailbox whose carved, ornate letters spelled out WATERMERE.

Finally.

He signaled despite being the only living soul for miles. When the Civic left the thick gravel and disappeared into the woods, its wheels aligning with the twin tire paths that doubled for a road, he felt an odd twinge of recognition. The hickories and oaks and maples leaned over the road like knights with swords drawn, admitting their king.

And wasn’t that the truth? Unless the pictures the lawyers had sent him had been doctored in some way, Paul was about to take possession of a mansion. He chuckled, giddy with disbelief. He was a modern-day baron, a landed count.

Bushes thwacked the Civic, reeling him back toward reality. He’d need to do something about the flora threatening to overtake the lane. He knew Myles had been an old man, but he still could have employed someone, a local kid maybe, to keep the road from going to seed.

The woods opened up, and all he could do was stop the car and stare. Watermere was beautiful.
 He couldn’t believe that this sprawling Victorian home was his.
 As Paul pulled forward, he took it all in. Though majestic, the house needed work. He noted the way the porch awning sagged, the cracks in the brick façade, the dead ivy. He doubted the old man had spent much time on upkeep in his twilight years. He studied the detached double garage up ahead and wondered whether either side was occupied.

Paul stopped, threw the car into park. Getting out, he entered the side door of the garage. Flicking the switch, he saw it was empty. The closed air smelled vaguely of kerosene. He scanned the wall for the automatic door opener but couldn’t find one. Then, he spotted the rope attached to the garage door lying there on the floor. He crossed to it, bent and lifted.

The garage door roared up on its tracks. It made a frightful racket, but something about the noise appealed to him, as though he were announcing his ownership of the house by startling it awake.

Climbing back into the Civic, he shifted into gear and rolled into the stall. He cut the engine and got out, relishing the simple pleasure of housing his car in a garage. It was the first time, other than parking garages, he’d had the Civic indoors. He patted its roof fondly and went out.

Paul stared up at the house. He’d never imagined he would live in such a place. In fact, he never thought he’d own a house period. His father always told him how silly it was to waste money on rent, but Paul feared ownership, as though purchasing a home in the city would somehow bind him to it for the rest of his life. It was admitting defeat to buy a home near his family, he reasoned, so he kept his crackerbox apartment. Now he understood the pride his father had talked about.

He trotted toward the porch and mounted it in three strides. It winded him. He stood there panting, his belly drooping over his waistband.

He resolved to get into better shape.

Cupping his temples, he pushed his face close to the beveled door window and discerned a foyer made of checkered tile.

A manila envelope lay at his feet. He picked it up and ripped the top open. Bypassing the papers crammed inside, his groping fingers found the key, pulled it out. Taking one more deep breath, he sighed and slid the key into the lock. A dull click sounded. He thumbed the steel button.

Paul went in.

*And…cut!*

Thank you again to Erin for being so awesome. She really is awesome, by the way—she’s easily one of the kindest and funniest people I’ve met since becoming a writer. I hope you all read HOUSE OF SKIN. You can get it now anywhere e-books are sold like Amazon, or Samhain’s website, or Barnes and Noble… (with the paperback coming in October). And if you want to learn more about my books or me, go to www.jonathanjanz.com.

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