Tag Archives: Samhain Horror

Historical Witchfinding 101 featuring Matthew Hopkins: Article by Catherine Cavendish of The Pendle Curse

Catherine Cavendish, an author friend of mine who writes great gothic ghost tales from the UK, just released her latest novel with Samhain Horror, called The Pendle Curse, on Feb. 3, 2015. A mix of history, the paranormal, and subdued creepiness, her novels put a modern twist on the classic atmospheric telling of tales. This current novel delves into a past that includes a harrowing tale of witches.

Of course, as most readers know, I love to read anything to do with witches as well, so I’ve been highly anticipating this novel! My review will come soon, but in the meantime, take a moment to learn about the most infamous witch finder of all time, Matthew Hopkins.

Have  you heard of England’s Matthew Hopkins? The Infamous Witchfinder General

by Catherine Cavendish, author of The Pendle Curse

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A photo of Matthew Hopkins / Photo supplied by C. Cavendish

My new novel – The Pendle Curse – has some of its roots in a true story. In August 1612, ten men and women were convicted, in Lancaster, England, of crimes related to witchcraft and subsequently hanged on Gallows Hill. They became known to history as the Pendle Witches. Their trial created a template for others to follow, and one who was no doubt inspired by it was none other than the most infamous witch hunter of them all. The self-styled, ‘Witchfinder General’, Matthew Hopkins.

Hopkins was born in 1620 and little is known about his early life. His most famous career lasted just a couple of years – between 1644 until his retirement in 1647, but in fourteen months of that time, he managed to be responsible for the deaths of some 300 women, mainly in the eastern counties of England. All were convicted of witchcraft, on his authority. The total number of executions for witchcraft between the 15th and 18th centuries amounts to less than 500. Matthew Hopkins and his colleague, John Stearne, certainly contributed more than their fair share.

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Since the Lancashire witch trials of 1612 that convicted the Pendle witches, the law had been changed. It was now necessary to provide material proof that accused person had practiced witchcraft. It was the role of Hopkins and Stearne to provide evidence that the accused had entered into a pact with the devil. A confession was vital – from the human, as the devil would hardly confess.

Hopkins travelled freely throughout eastern England, although Essex was his centre of operations. His career as witchfinder began when he heard a group of women talking about meeting the devil in Manningtree in March 1644. Twenty three women were tried at Chelmsford in 1645. Four died in prison and nineteen were convicted and hanged. Hopkins was well paid for his work and this may well have spurred him on to be even more zealous. He and Stearne travelled with a team and wherever they turned up, the local community found themselves handing over significant amounts of money. In Ipswich, this was so great, that a special local tax had to be created to fund it!

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Hopkins’s methods were dubious to say the least. He would employ torture, including sleep deprivation. He would ‘cut’ the arm of a witch with a blunt knife and if, as was likely, she did not bleed, she was pronounced a witch. He was also a great fan of the ‘swimming’ test, or ducking. As witches were believed to have renounced their baptism, water would reject them. So, they were tied to a chair and thrown in the river. Those who floated were guilty. Those who drowned were innocent.

Hopkins also favoured the practice of ‘pricking’. Basically this involved searching the accused’s body for any unusual blemishes or moles. A knife or needle was used to test the mark. If it bled, on being pricked, the woman was innocent. If it failed to bleed, she was guilty. It has long been alleged that many of these ‘prickers’ had a retractable point, so that the hapless prisoner would be confirmed as a witch when the mark failed to bleed. What better way for a ‘witchfinder’ to enhance his reputation than by identifying so many ‘witches’?

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Hopkins and his merry band spread fear all over the countryside, but their reign was short-lived. John Gaule, vicar of Great Staughton in Cambridgeshire, preached a number of sermons denouncing him. His opposition began when he visited a woman who was being held in gaol on charges of witchcraft, until such time as Hopkins could attend to investigate her guilt or innocence. Gaule heard of a letter Hopkins had sent, where he had enquired as to whether he would be given a ‘good welcome’ in that area. A good, financially rewarding welcome no doubt. At around the same time, justices of the assizes in Norfolk questioned Hopkins and Stearne about their methods of torture (which was outlawed in England) and the extortionate fees.

The writing was clearly all over the wall. Their reign of terror was over. By the time the next court session sat, both Hopkins and Stearne had conveniently retired and the infamous Witchfinder General had put away his witch ‘pricker’ for the last time. But that was, sadly, not the end of his story.

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Hopkins published a book, called The Discovery of Witches, in 1647, where he outlined his witch-hunting methods. This ensured his legacy lived on – and expanded far beyond the shores of his native England. Witch-hunting in New England began, according to his methods, and, in 1692, some of Hopkins’s methods were once again employed at Salem, Massachusetts.

Now, here’s the cover and blurb for The Pendle Curse~

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Four hundred years ago, ten convicted witches were hanged on Gallows Hill. Now they are back…for vengeance.

Laura Phillips’s grief at her husband’s sudden death shows no sign of passing. Even sleep brings her no peace. She experiences vivid, disturbing dreams of a dark, brooding hill, and a man—somehow out of time—who seems to know her. She discovers that the place she has dreamed about exists. Pendle Hill. And she knows she must go there. But as soon as she arrives, the dream becomes a nightmare. She is caught up in a web of witchcraft and evil…and a curse that will not die.

Here’s a short extract from the beginning~

His spirit soared within him and flew up into the storm-clad sky as blackness descended and the rain became a tempest.

He flew. Lost in a maelstrom of swirling mists. Somewhere a baby cried until its sobs became distorted, tortured roars. Beyond, a black void loomed. He saw Alizon’s spirit just ahead and tried to call out to her, but his voice couldn’t reach her.

Beside him, another spirit cried out. His mother. He flinched at her screams before they were drowned in the mass—that terrible parody of some hideous child.

The blackness metamorphosed. An amorphous shape formed as his eyes struggled to see with their new vision—the gift of death. Small baby limbs flailed towards him. Eyes of fire flashed as a toothless mouth opened. Screeching, roaring and demanding to be fed. Demanding its mother.

His spirit reached out for his lover. Tried to pull her back. “Alizon!”

She turned anguished eyes to him. “It calls to me.”

He recognized it instantly. The blazing fire. The devil child. That cursed infant had come for them.

Again he reached out with arms that no longer felt connected to him, but he was powerless to stop Alizon being swept away, deep into the abomination’s maw.

“No!” His cry reverberated around him—a wail of anguish in a sea of torment.

Then…silence. Only he remained, drifting in swirling gray mists of time.

“I will find you, sweet Alizon. One day I will find you. And I will find the one who betrayed us.”

From somewhere, he heard an echo…

You can buy The Pendle Curse here~

Samhain Publishing

Amazon

Barnes and Noble

Kobo

Catherine Cavendish, Biography~

Catherine CavendishCatherine Cavendish – Cat to her friends – lives with her husband in a haunted 18th century building in North Wales. Fortunately for all concerned, the ghost is friendly and contents herself (she’s definitely female) with switching on lights, and attempting to discover how the TV and washing machine work (it’s a long story!).

Following a varied career in sales, advertising and career guidance, Cat is now the full time author of a number of paranormal, ghostly and Gothic horror novels, novellas and short stories. She is the 2013 joint winner of the Samhain Gothic Horror Anthology Competition, with Linden Manor, which features in the anthology What Waits In The ShadowsThe Pendle Curse is her latest novel for Samhain; her first  – Saving Grace Devine – was published in 2014.

Her daily walks have so far provided the inspiration for two short stories and a novella. As she says, “It’s amazing what you see down by the river, as it flows through a sleepy rural community.” Those with delicate constitutions are advised not to ask!

You can connect with Cat here~

Catherine Cavendish (website)

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It’s Krampusnacht! Find Out Who Author Matt Manochio Would Cast in His Movie

It’s Dec. 5 and Krampusnacht, the night that Krampus, with his horned-head, lolling tongue, and bushy fur comes out with bag or wash bucket on his back to cart of naughty children, pass out coal, and beat those who’ve been spicy with a switch!  So, you better hope you’ve been good, because tomorrow is Saint Nicholas Day and you’ll want to be able to enjoy smiles and gifts and give that rosy cheeked icon a hug. I doubt Krampus gives hugs.

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I just love any good folklore and have always been a fan of Christmas Around the World mythology. Anyway, for almost a few months now I’ve been working at the publicist for Matt Manochio, the author of The Dark Servant that released on Nov. 4, giving readers just enough time to plan to be good before today hit. I know I didn’t want my hiney beat with a bundle of twigs! It’s been a BLAST! You can see all the tour stops we’ve had and places we’ve spread the word about Krampus (who, what, where, when), HERE.

If you haven’t picked up your copy of The Dark Servant, don’t miss out on the fun. But also, Matt has a wonderful message in the book about teenage bullying, stemming from school shootings and such. It’s a book that hits the Young Adult market as well, and the prose is clean enough for that sort of purchase. He has solid characters and really brings a true legend to life. It’s an amazing debut for an author we’ll see a lot more of in the future.

AND DON’T MISS THE GIVEAWAY CONTEST BELOW TO WIN A KRAMPUS HOODIE AND SIGNED COPY OF THE BOOK! READ ALL THE WAY DOWN TO LEARN HOW TO MAKE A COOL PINTEREST BOARD AND WIN THE CONTEST.

Now, in honor of Krampusnacht, Matt has written a special post just for my blog. Since he’s running on fumes to create awareness of Krampus (and The Dark Servant), I think Santa will bring him special gifts in his stocking this year, don’t you?

Take it away, Matt!

Who Would I Cast in My Krampus Movie?
by Matt Manochio, Author

Matt Dressedin  Krampus Mask / Photo Courtesy of Bob Karp

Matt Dressed in Krampus Mask During Recent Book Signing / Photo Courtesy of Bob Karp

It is Krampusnacht today—just like it is in my book, The Dark Servant.

When writing any type of novel, the author typically envisions which actors would be best for the movie. Because we all want to sell the movie rights. One independent Krampus film has already been released. Kevin Smith, of Clerks fame, and a Jersey guy like me, will release a movie with four Krampus vignettes next Christmas. And I believe there’s one other film in the works.

Steven Spielberg, George Lucas, JJ Abrams and Ridley Scott, listen up! I’m willing to cut a deal, on the condition that I get a say in the casting. (I know I’m in absolutely no position to make these demands, but stay with me.)

Here’s my cast.

Character: Billy Schweitzer: a 17-year-old high school junior who’s 5’9, has a wiry build and blond hair.

Actor: Peta from The Hunger Games movies. Most teenage girls will know the actor’s name, which I’m too lazy to look up. But this guy fits the generic mold and could pass for a teenager even though he’s probably 30 by now.

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Josh Hutcherson (aka Peeta)

Character: Maria Flynn: a 17-year-old high school junior with red hair and who Billy desires more than Gargameldesires Smurfs. (It’s early, my coffee hasn’t kicked in. I’ll try to come up with something better later.)

Actress: Molly Quinn. That’s right! Castle’s daughter. Yes, I know her name but not Peta’s. Get over it. And to my wife, I love you. And Quinn could actually pass for Maria because she’s 21. Sissy Spacek was 27 when Carrie hit screens in 1976. Honestly, casting people?This is a no-brainer.

Character: Donald Schweitzer: middle-aged police chief, fit, 6’4 blond.

Actor: John Schneider: Yes, Bo Duke from the Dukes of Hazzard. I figure SyFy could get in on the action and make an obscene preemptive bid for the film rights, and if they do, John Schneider has SyFy movie sheriff written all over him because I’m pretty sure he’s played one in the past. If John’s busy (which I doubt would be the case), the backup choice is Sir Kenneth Branagh. He’ll probably have to hit the weight room, but if he can play Gilderoy Lockhart, he can pull off Don Schweitzer even though the characters are in no way comparable.

John Schneider

John Schneider

Character: Tim Schweitzer: 18-year-old high school senior—tall, blond, and built like his father, Donald.

Actor: Thor. You know, the Australian guy who was just named People’s Sexiest Famous Actor Alive. You ever notice that people who aren’t famous actors never get Sexiest Man Alive consideration? I mean, nobody’s called me. That’s why I changed the category name (because it’s accurate). But I figure putting a big hunk of man candy in the movie will draw the ladies.

Character: Mike Brembs: Billy’s best friend who’s irreverent and skinny as a rail with black hair.

Actor: Sean Penn from 30 years ago, right around the time he played Jeff Spicoli from Fast Times at Ridgemont High. Unfortunately the government hasn’t gotten around to making those solar-powered time machines that get crappy mileage, so we’ll have to go with someone more current. So, let’s see, how about Corey Feldman from 20 years ago. Oh, that’s right. The time machine. Damn! Oh, just cast a damn Jonas Brother. You pick.

Character: Travis Reardon: blond high school quarterback, typical 18-year-old jock.

Actor: Meth Damon. That’s right, that asshole from Breaking Bad who got what he deserved from Jesse after Mr. White popped the trunk and mowed down the skinheads.

Character: Brittany Cabot: Travis’ obnoxious blonde girlfriend who’s also 18 and a cheerleader pretty blonde.

Actress: Kate Upton. Just because. We gotta draw the guys, too. And maybe we can get Justin Verlander’s butt to make a cameo. (Just Google Kate Upton, Justin Verlander, and butt or ass.)

Character: Jason Nicholson: a high school bully who’s Billy’s age and who absolutely deserves to get the shit beat out of him.

Actor: Justin Bieber. Because we all want to see this guy get the shit beat out of him. Even the Canadians.

And finally …

Character: Krampus! A 10-foot-tall furry devil with otherworldly strength and sly personality, and who wields a long chain and a club made of birch branches.

Actor: Daniel Day-Lewis wearing a fur suit and a boatload of prosthetic makeup. Under no circumstance do I want my Krampus to be CGI. Give me a guy in a rubber monster mask over Gollum any day of the week. And I don’t want just anybody running around in that suit, I want someone who’ll get into the role and stay there, like your loser stoner brother in the basement. I like the idea of Daniel Day-Lewis thinking he’s Krampus all day on the set, even during lunch break, screaming at the cameramen and beating the gaffers.

Daniel Day Lewis

Daniel Day Lewis

This is just a partial list, there are so many more characters to cast, but these are some of the big roles. And yes, I plan on being a background character somewhere in there. (Again, this is my fantasy. Play along.)

So, Stephen, George, JJ, Ridley, you know where to find me. And if you don’t, it’s not hard. Ask your assistants.

About Krampus~

December 5 is Krampus Nacht — Night of the Krampus, a horned, cloven-hoofed monster who in pre-Christian European cultures serves as the dark companion to Saint Nicholas, America’s Santa Claus. Saint Nicholas rewards good children and leaves bad ones to Krampus, who kidnaps and tortures kids unless they repent.

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The Dark Servant, Synopsis~

Santa’s not the only one coming to town …

It’s older than Christ and has tormented European children for centuries. Now America faces its wrath. Unsuspecting kids vanish as a blizzard crushes New Jersey. All that remains are signs of destruction—and bloody hoof prints stomped in snow. Seventeen-year-old Billy Schweitzer awakes December 5 feeling depressed. Already feuding with his police chief father and golden boy older brother, Billy’s devastated when his dream girl rejects him. When an unrelenting creature infiltrates his town, imperiling his family and friends, Billy must overcome his own demons to understand why his supposedly innocent high school peers have been snatched, and how to rescue them from a famous saint’s ruthless companion—that cannot be stopped.

The Dark Servant is everything a thriller should be—eerie, original and utterly engrossing!”
Wendy Corsi Staub, New York Times bestselling author

“Beautifully crafted and expertly plotted, Matt Manochio’s The Dark Servant has taken an esoteric fairy tale from before Christ and sets it in the modern world of media-saturated teenagers—creating a clockwork mechanism of terror that blends Freddy Krueger with the Brothers Grimm! Highly recommended!”
Jay Bonansinga, New York Times bestselling author of The Walking Dead: The Fall of the Governor

“Matt Manochio is a writer who’ll be thrilling us for many books to come.”
Jim DeFelice, New York Times bestselling co-author of American Sniper

“Matt Manochio has taken a very rare fairytale and turned it into a real page-turner. Matt has constructed a very real and believable force in Krampus and has given it a real journalistic twist, and he has gained a fan in me!”
David L. Golemon, New York Times bestselling author of the Event Group Series

“I scarcely know where to begin. Is this a twisted parental fantasy of reforming recalcitrant children? Is it Fast Times at Ridgemont High meets Nightmare on Elm Street? Is it a complex revision of the Medieval morality play? In The Dark Servant, Matt Manochio has taken the tantalizing roots of Middle Europe’s folklore and crafted a completely genuine modern American horror story. This is a winter’s tale, yes, but it is also a genuinely new one for our modern times. I fell for this story right away. Matt Manochio is a natural born storyteller.”
Joe McKinney, Bram Stoker Award-winning author of The Savage Dead and Dog Days

“Just in time for the season of Good Will Toward Men, Matt Manochio’s debut delivers a fresh dose of Holiday Horror, breathing literary life into an overlooked figure of legend ready to step out of Santa’s shadow. Prepared to be thrilled in a new, old-fashioned way.”
Hank Schwaeble, Bram Stoker Award-winning author of Damnable, Diabolical and The Angel of the Abyss

“In The Dark Servant, Manochio spins a riveting tale of a community under siege by a grotesque, chain-clanking monster with cloven-hooves, a dry sense of wit, and a sadistic predilection for torture. As Christmas nears and a snowstorm paralyzes the town, the terrifying Krampus doesn’t just leave switches for the local bullies, bitches, and badasses, he beats the living (editor’s note: rhymes with skit) out of them! Manochio balances a very dark theme with crackling dialogue, fast-paced action, and an engaging, small-town setting.”
Lucy Taylor, Bram Stoker Award-winning author of The Safety of Unknown Cities

“A fast-paced thrill-ride into an obscure but frightful Christmas legend. Could there be a dark side to Santa? And if so, what would he do to those kids who were naughty? Matt Manochio provides the nail-biting answer with The Dark Servant.”
John Everson, Bram Stoker Award-winning author of Violet Eyes

“A high-octane blast of horror. A surefire hit for fans of monsters and gore.”
Mario Acevedo, author of Werewolf Smackdown

“Have yourself a scary, nightmare-y little Christmas with The Dark Servant. Matt Manochio’s holiday horror brings old world charm to rural New Jersey, Krampus-style.”
Jon McGoran, author of Drift

Matt Manochio, Biography~

MattHeadshotMatt Manochio is the author of The Dark Servant (Samhain Publishing, November 4, 2014). He is a supporting member of the Horror Writers Association, and he hates writing about himself in the third person but he’ll do it anyway.He spent 12 years as an award-winning newspaper reporter at the Morris County, N.J., Daily Record, and worked for one year as an award-winning page designer at the Anderson, S.C., Independent-Mail. He currently works as a full-time editor and a freelance writer.The highlights of his journalism career involved chronicling AC/DC for USA Today: in 2008, when the band kicked off its Black Ice world tour, and in 2011 when lead singer Brian Johnson swung by New Jersey to promote his autobiography. For you hardcore AC/DC fans, check out the video on my YouTube channel.

To get a better idea about my path toward publication, please read my Writer’s Digest guest post: How I Sold My Supernatural Thriller.

Matt’s a dedicated fan of bullmastiffs, too. (He currently doesn’t own one because his house is too small. Bullmastiff owners understand this all too well.)

Matt doesn’t have a favorite author, per se, but owns almost every Dave Barry book ever published, and he loves blending humor into his thrillers when warranted. Some of his favorite books include Salem’s Lot, Jurassic Park, The Hobbit, Animal Farm, and To Kill a Mockingbird.

When it comes to writing, the only advice he can give is to keep doing it, learn from mistakes, and regardless of the genre, read Chris Roerden’s Don’t Sabotage Your Submission (2008, Bella Rosa Books).

Matt grew up in New Jersey, where he lives with his wife and son. He graduated from the University of Delaware in 1997 with a bachelor’s degree in history/journalism.

Author Photo Credit: Eric Schnare

See more about Matt and his book on his website: http://www.mattmanochio.com and follow him on Facebook, Twitter (@MattManochio), Pinterest.

Tour Giveaway!

For everyone! CREATE a PINTEREST board by choosing one of the following themes: Krampus, Old World Legends, Vintage Holiday, Old World Christmas, Christmas Around the World, Traditions and Legends,  Myths, Monsters, and Horror, or something very similar.

Second rule: You must pin Matt’s book cover and Amazon purchase link or Samhain Horror Purchase link. Third Rule: Follow Matt Manochio and Erin Al-Mehairi.

Third Recommendation: Extra points for pinning extra things about Matt, such as tour page, articles, etc.

Your board will be judged on the above PLUS your creativity and effort in the project! Send Erin at hookofabook@hotmail.com your Pinterest page to enter by Dec. 8. Of course you can continue to use it through the Holiday if you wish!

Prize: A “Santa Checked His List and I’m on the Naughty Side” package. This will include your choice of Krampus themed apparel (t-shirt or sweatshirt, men or women, visuals to come) and a signed paperback of the book.

There might be shipping limitations. Check back to tour page before entering if you live outside the U.S. for updated information.

Example:

http://www.pinterest.com/erinalmehairi/its-old-world-christmas/

And a board about Matt:

http://www.pinterest.com/erinalmehairi/the-dark-servant-matt-manochio/

Giveaway for Reviewers!

Anyone on the tour, or outside the tour, who reviews The Dark Servant on Amazon and GoodReads and sends their review link into Erin (Publicist for Matt Manochio) at hookofabook@hotmail.com, now through Dec. 31, 2014, will be entered to win a $25 Amazon gift card.

Matt tour graphic Dark Servant

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Filed under Feature Articles, Guest Posts

Brian Moreland’s The Vagrants Tugs at My Heart Strings, Makes My Pulse Race, and then Horrifies Me: This is Good, Of Course!

Vagrants cover 2

Talking about The Vagrants, New Novella from Brian Moreland~

I’ve been so busy that I’ve held off talking about a new exciting release called The Vagrants, even though I read it weeks ago, but I just can’t keep it in anymore. I had the chance to read an advanced review copy of this novella and gobbled it down in one sitting. I hope launch day found you all buying it, but if you haven’t, please do snap up this novella from Brian Moreland.  It’s a great piece of writing, available in e-format, for just about $3. (You can head to Brian’s website by clicking on the book cover above right now, just remember to come back).

Here’s the synopsis~

Beneath the city of Boston evil is gathering.

Journalist Daniel Finley is determined to save the impoverished of the world. But the abandoned part of humanity has a dark side too. While living under a bridge with the homeless for six months, Daniel witnessed something terrifying. Something that nearly cost him his sanity.

Now, two years later, he’s published a book that exposes a deadly underground cult and its charismatic leader. And Daniel fears the vagrants are after him because of it. At the same time, his father is being terrorized by vicious mobsters. As he desperately tries to help his father, Daniel gets caught up in the middle of a war between the Irish-American mafia and a deranged cult of homeless people who are preparing to shed blood on the streets of Boston.

Brian’s a great friend of mine, but he’s a great writer first and foremost. I would not have met him had I not been his biggest fan girl and all–and then there was the fact that he was hooked on my cookies!! There isn’t a book I haven’t liked from Brian–he’s a seasoned writer who has been traditionally published, re-published, is an internationally award-winning author and videographer, and he’s been around the writing world awhile even topping best seller lists.  If you haven’t heard that, it’s because he’s pretty humble, but really this guy is one-of-a-kind.  Now published primarily by Samhain Publishing’s horror line, they released his novella The Vagrants this June.

I said to Brian a year or so ago, “you know, all your books take place in the woods.” Which too me was awesome–I love horror, thrillers, and historicals that take place in the forest–but he may have not wanted to be pigeonholed I guess. I love his historical reads, like Shadows in the Mist, which takes on the Nazi Occult, or my favorite book Dead of Winter, which surrounds a 1800s outpost in the Canadian wilderness. I love The Devil’s Woods, which I had the honor of helping him critique, with its Native American characters, legends, and of course, the woods. Being a huge fan of witches, he even pulled me in with his novella, The Witching House, which again, takes place in a wooded area.

But he decided to switch it up on me with The Vagrants, as he sets it in none other than my favorite city, Boston, but nowhere near a forest!! As I’m reading he’s taking me into the depth of the city, the tunnels and the abandoned factories, and he’s making me care about the writer in turmoil, and the homeless, and terrifying me about the Irish Mafia. Yet, STILL I loved it.

Here’s why. (Well, besides the fact that it’s BOSTON).  No matter the setting with Brian, woods or city, he has a unique way of blending modern protagonists and characters who are emotionally wretched, uncertain, and have something to prove or redeem themselves from. As he sets into motion their inner turmoil and creates a whole back story that we enjoy just for that emotional connection with them.

His prose is succinct, detailed yet to the point, quick-moving, and cinematic. His protagonist, author and journalist Daniel Finley, is well-rounded and I feel I know him within the matter of a few chapters. We almost forget we are reading a horror novel, but are enjoying a thriller with some suspense…..and then BAM! He just blows it out of the water with a major dose of action, horror, gore, and in this case, supernatural with an element of H. P. Lovecraft and Clive Barker with a dose of The Walking Dead thrown in for good measure. And since I hate the genre that The Walking Dead falls in, Brian does a good job of making me love something I forget that I don’t like. He makes me care and then horrifies me in a way that hypnotizes me so I can’t begin to pull myself away.

The Vagrants tore at my heart-strings due to Daniel’s angst over making it as a writer and his career near and dear to my heart (journalist!), the guilt he feels from depending on his dad for his college and his subsequent financial support, his fight to redeem the name and life of his dad who went to extreme lengths to support him, and then, of course, there is the tale of the homeless living in the city’s tunnels and a strange occurrence happening among them that Daniel goes undercover to report on.

The Vagrants is a phenomenal novella that intermixes all the best short story ideas of Stephen King’s societal yarns, focusing on character development, and yet writing with more staccato prose and less filler such as the master suspense author John Saul and the imaginary, subterranean, otherworldly, monsteresque, cannibalistic, supernatural writing of Clive Barker.

If you haven’t read Brian Moreland, start now with The Vagrants, but don’t stop there, check out his entire back list. They’re well worth the money and are all unique and highly well-written and edited. He’s a top-notch author you’ll not want to miss, whether you meet him in the woods or below the city streets of Boston.

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW~

And now, I’ve had the opportunity to ask Brian a few probing questions about his newest work. He said that he’s unveiled some things here about his life and his book that he hasn’t anywhere else! I think my questions offer some insight you’ll enjoy and his answers allow you to delve deeper into the book as I did when I laid awake thinking about it at length. Please do let us know what you think!

So without further introduction, as he’s sitting here with a smile on his face and a beer in his hand…and he’s already spied all the cookies I set out, though he won’t eat them now, he’s been to the gym and drank a green smoothie, but it’s so much fun to tempt him…at any rate, I welcome Brian to the site today!

Erin: Hi, Brian!! Let me get you a napkin for those cookie crumbs, because I think I saw you sneak one. Let’s turn off the baseball and get down to a discussion of your work.

BM: Hi, Erin, it’s great to be back as a guest of Oh, for the Hook of a Book! I’m trying to eat healthy,  you  know!

Q: Where did you find your inspiration for The Vagrants? What led you to Boston, one of my most favorite cities?

BM: The Vagrants started out as a short story I wrote many years ago when I was writing a lot of short fiction. The story was originally set in Chicago about some mobsters having to get rid of some vagrants that were squatting in their building. Last year, I re-read the story and liked the dark mystery. I moved the story to Boston, because I wanted the horror element to come from an abandoned underground subway and the Boston’s T has plenty of creepy tunnels that have been closed off for decades. I created a new main character, Daniel Finley, and made him a reporter who was doing an undercover story and witnessed something he shouldn’t have. The new, revised version was supposed to be just a short story, but the more I kept writing, the more I saw a bigger story and expanded it into a novella.

Q: I loved that you chose a journalist to be your lead. It’s always a fear of ours, as journalists, that a story will lead us into horrible circumstances…kidding!! Well, maybe not as I at first wanted to be a foreign war correspondent! But I do like how you used this profession for your protagonist. Your book had some social undertones at the start, was this meant to layer your book? I always think some of the best horror interweaves societal turmoil. What do you think?

BM: Yes, the social undertones were meant to add a layer to the story and make Daniel Finley a sympathetic character as he starts out attempting to do something good for humanity. Also, I’ve had my own experiences with homeless people. There used to be a shanty town beneath a bridge here in Dallas. I don’t know what happened to the shanty town or the people who lived under the bridge, but it looks like the city made them move on and then cleaned up that area. Another time I was helping out a homeless married couple. I offered to just give them some money so they could get back on their feet, but they were very proud. The husband was an ex-soldier and a very good handyman. He had hit hard times and couldn’t find a job. His wife was a housewife and mother of two kids. The husband insisted that he and his wife work for the money, so for a couple months I gave them odd jobs at my house. In the mornings, I’d pick them up at this slum motel they were staying at. One morning, while I parked outside waiting for them, I saw this tall homeless man emerge from beneath a nearby bridge. He crossed through a weed-ridden field toward the motel. At first, I just casually watched the man hiking through the weeds and then turned my attention back on the upstairs apartment door. The married couple was taking longer than usual to get ready. When I turned back to the field, I was shocked to see the homeless man approaching my vehicle, reaching for the passenger door. Before I could hit the locks, the passenger door opened and the homeless man climbed inside and sat right beside me and closed the door. He was bigger than me, sweaty and filthy. He just looked right at me with this crazy grin and said, “Hey.” My fear of being attacked at close range skyrocketed. I panicked and yelled, “What the bleep are you doing in my car? Get the bleep out!” I think I scared him as much as he scared me, because he opened the car door and was out of the vehicle in half a second. I believe in treating homeless people with respect and helping them out when I can, but when they climb into a car with you that crosses a line. A few minutes later the married couple came down to my car and told me that guy was crazy and I did the right thing. Those up-close experiences with homeless people influenced the writing of Daniel Finley’s story.

In answer to your question, yes, if you look between the words of a horror novel, there is often a social message or warning. I didn’t write my story to purposely have one. I mainly focused on characterization and writing a horror story that would entertain readers.

Erin: Leave it to me to find more in a story than what was planned…..lol!

Q: I enjoyed how you intertwined the modern crime and mafia feel into the surreal world of the unknown. How did this come together as you were writing it?

BM: As I mentioned earlier, this story started from the viewpoint of a mafia family dealing with a problem with vagrants. I had liked mixing the mobster genre with horror, but my characters were all bad guys in the short story. I needed a hero readers could root for, so I created Daniel, a man who grew up in South Boston and has a father who did his best to keep Daniel away from the O’Malley family. Connecting Daniel with the O’Malley’s and the vagrants took a little puzzle solving to work out the plot, but eventually the story came together.

Q: You packed a lot of substance into a short novella so that it read like a full novel. Your character development of your lead, Daniel, was superb and you were able to show us the human elements of parental struggles, regret, guilt, and the need for redemption. Where do you pull your feelings from for these characters? Do you feel that these common emotional themes are what drives people to reading horror?

BM: Thanks. I did my best to add depth to a story that’s just over 100 pages. It’s about the length of a 90-minute movie, and to accomplish building the story with many layers, I wrote this in scenes, just like a movie with lots of dialogue, and painted the world around Daniel with as few words as possible and kept the action moving. I pulled my feelings for Daniel and his father from my own experiences. My parents helped me financially through college, and even after college I got into some financial troubles and had to borrow money from my dad. For a long time I felt guilt for not being able to pay him back. He never gave me a guilt trip, but I could relate to Daniel’s need to be financially independent and prove to his father that he was a man who could make it on his own.

Q: How can horror be explained to those naysayers of this “red-headed step-child” genre? How can readers and writers of the genre encourage others to be open minded and not “judge a book by its cover” or in other words, have preconceived notions?

BM: Well, first I’d say that the naysayers probably think reading a horror novel is the same as watching a horror movie, which many of the straight-to-DVD movies are terrible and derivative of all the horror movies that came before them. Reading horror fiction is an entirely different experience. For one, it’s very personal to the author, and so there’s usually more emotional depth than a movie. Two, reading gives the reader a much more personal experience, where everything is happening to them through the points-of-view of characters. It’s one thing to watch people being chased by zombies on the big screen. It feels much more real when you’re inside a character and the zombies are chasing after you. There are many great authors out there putting a fresh spin on horror. I’d say read several of them and you’ll discover reading horror can be really fun.

Q: Now that I’ve read all your books, I have a more clear idea of a theme running among some of them. It creeped up on me. There is a certain type of horror I hate (which I think you know what that is), but yet, you keep surprising me with it. It seeps into my reading without me even realizing it and then there is no going back. So I do like it, just don’t let me know in the beginning. Ha!

How do you create your stories in such a way that by the time the ending has smacked me in the face, I am shocked and surprised that I am reading it AND liking it? How do you get the reader so invested?

BM: Thanks, I’ll take that as a compliment. (Erin comments: PLEASE DO!!) I do my best to write the kind of horror that seeps into your brain, gets under your skin, and makes you feel what the characters are feeling. The main key is characterization. If readers aren’t invested in the characters, they won’t follow them into the dark house or abandoned building where the horror is waiting for them. I think another technique is knowing how to write a mystery and peeling back the layers slowly, so the reader is constantly wanting to know what’s at the end of maze you’re leading them through. If I’ve done my job right, then you’ll be feeling chills and thrills and finally an adrenaline rush, and that’s what makes you surprised that you are enjoying the story, even when it gets scary and bloody. I’m glad you’ve been willing to read my kind of horror.

Q: Have you ever thought about writing a novel about a fantasy world? Another realm? Science-fiction? It seems to me that your mind would take you there if you were open enough to it?

BM: I don’t know if I’ll ever write a story that’s pure fantasy. I love real-world, human characters who must confront the supernatural and horrific. I like part of my stories grounded in reality and then we discover another, darker parallel world has secretly existed alongside us―underground, in basements, hiding among us yet disguised as human. The Vagrants, which is art horror, part urban fantasy, was inspired by my love for reading Clive Barker and H.P. Lovecraft, who are masters at creating other dimension creatures that crossover into our world.

Q: What makes some of your horror different from anyone else’s work? I have my own thoughts, but I’d love to hear how you think you connect separately with readers?

BM: Hmm, I’m not really sure what makes me different. I’ve never really thought of my writing as unique, just doing my best to measure up to the successful horror-thriller writers who came before me. I mix a lot of genres and often have more than one horror element going on, like a creature and serial killer in the same story. I learned this from reading a lot of Dean Koontz. I love characters with depth, so I spend a lot of time developing my characters so readers care about them. I also put a lot of emphasis on atmosphere, so that wherever I set the story, you feel like you are there. I’m very lean with my descriptions. Because I studied screenwriting in college, I’ve applied my script writing skills to my novels, where each chapter flows together like movies scenes. They are driven by action and dialogue, cause and effect. The characters are driven by an emotional force that propels them to deal with whatever horrific antagonist they are up against, whether it’s a monster, serial killer, demon or ghost. I don’t spend a lot of time contemplating the universe or preaching my ideals. In fact, I do my best to take myself out of the story. I focus on story and attempt to breathe life into fictional characters that feel like real people. My writing style would probably be considered pulp fiction.

Q: What are you writing next? What new ideas do you have for future novels and novellas?

BM: I’m currently working on a three-volume short story anthology that’s a collection of short stories I’ve written over the years, along with some new ones that I can’t wait to share with readers. The stories range from supernatural horror, like “The Dealer of Needs,” some urban fantasy such as “Chasing the Dragon” and “The Cosmic Gate,” as well as some stories about serial killers, “The Pond” and “The Jack-O-Lantern Man.” I’m also working on some historical horror short stories, as well. I plan to release these three volumes as eBooks and in paperback. I’m also plotting out my next novella and novel.

Erin: Thanks so much for letting me, and my readers, be privy to your innermost thoughts as a writer. It’s always a wonderful time when I have you here.

BM: Thanks, Erin, for inviting me back. I always enjoy chatting with you.

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See an excerpt of The Vagrants, HERE!

Brian Moreland, Author~

brian 2014Brian Moreland writes novels and short stories of supernatural horror and dark suspense. His books include Dead of Winter, Shadows in the Mist, The Girl from the Blood Coven, The Witching House, and The Devil’s Woods, and The Vagrants.

Brian lives in Dallas, Texas, where he is diligently writing his next horror stories, and helping clients with their own books. In his free time, he watches movies, sports, and make guacamole!

Connect with Brian Moreland~

Website

Twitter: @BrianMoreland

Like Brian’s Facebook page

Brian’s blog

Find Brian’s books at Samhain Horror

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Praise for Brian~

“Brian Moreland writes a blend of survival horror and occult mystery that I find impossible to resist.  His writing is clean, precise, and, best of all, compulsively readable.  I know, when I’ve got one of his books in my hands, that I’m going to be lost to the world for hours on end. He’s just that good.”

Joe McKinney, author of Dead City and Flesh Eaters

“Brian Moreland writes horror on a level that soars above the usual fare, and THE VAGRANTS is no exception. Chocked full of scares and suspense, Moreland delivers a tale that will soon be a classic. This is the kind of story horror lovers need.”

Kristopher Rufty, author of Oak Hollow and The Lurkers

“I am in awe of Brian Moreland.”

Ronald Malfi, author of Snow and Floating Staircase

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Author Cat Cavendish on the Making and Inspiration of the Gothic Linden Manor

Today, Catherine Cavendish is here again to talk about the inspiration for the setting of her novella, Linden Manor.  Based on Wiltshire, in the English countryside, she also talks about the type of mansion she used and why, as well as other writing tidbit that went into the creation of her Gothic story. You can check out the interview we had earlier in week, HERE.  And be sure to read about her book following her guest article!

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Inspirational Wiltshire – The Perfect Setting
by Catherin Cavendish, Author

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I knew my story – Linden Manor – needed a rural setting. I knew a Gothic mansion had to be at the heart of it and that the land on which it stood must have history dating back thousands of years. Immediately, I knew there was only one place for me – the rolling hills of the green and pleasant land that is the English county of Wiltshire.

For a county that is nowhere near the largest (I believe it’s ranked around 14th out of 48 in terms of area), Wiltshire knows how to punch above its weight. The whole timeline of English history is encapsulated within its boundaries. Stonehenge and the even older Avebury, the manmade fortress of Silbury Hill, long chambered tomb of West Kennet and other prehistoric sites with names such as Sanctuary and Windmill Hill, never cease to entice and enthrall archaeologists, historians and even casual tourists from around the globe. It has been this way for centuries.

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In the eighteenth century, gentleman antiquarian, William Stukeley, studied the ancient stones circles at Stonehenge and concluded that Druids were responsible. He dated the creation of the monument to 460BC – a few thousand years too late. He furthermore decided that the Druids were also responsible for Avebury and while we have known for many years that this was also chronologically impossible, old ideas persist. Recent excavations at Stonehenge are beginning to radically revise the timelines there, suggesting a much earlier date than had previously been thought. Soon, the same may be said for Avebury.

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Stonehenge stands proud on Salisbury Plain, where sightings of UFOs have regularly been reported over the years. Some people vehemently maintain that magnetic forces are strong in that area and attracting alien visitors. Others maintain the ancients were acutely aware of these forces and this is what led them to choose the locations for the many stone circles dotted across the British landscape. Salisbury Plain is largely owned by the Ministry of Defence and used for army activities of many kinds, including tanks, artillery, aircraft etc. It is thought by many that experimental testing of new forms of armaments may well be responsible for some, if not all, sightings.

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Wiltshire is also the home of the famous White Horses – stylized depictions of horses, carved into the chalk hills. Of these, only the one shown here is ancient (probably Bronze Age), whereas the other seven surviving examples were carved within the last 300 years or so.

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Then we have the Moonrakers. These days, this is the collective name given to natives of Wiltshire, but, in past centuries the term related to a group of smugglers, probably from Devizes, who tried to avoid the excise men by hiding their ill-gotten hooch in a village pond. Under the full moon, they ‘raked’ the surface of the pond, causing ripples, meant to conceal the kegs beneath the surface. When the excise men challenged them, they claimed to be raking in a big cheese. The officers believed them to be simple country bumpkins and left them alone!

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And then there are the historic houses – stately homes and houses of architectural interest. Wiltshire has dozens of them. From magnificence of Wilton House, through to the homeliness of Great Chalfield Manor (pictured below) and across all styles in between, some are veritable palaces, while others provide a cosy, welcoming atmosphere. Not all though…

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My Linden Manor had to fall into the latter category. Gothic, imposing. A house of secrets. Wiltshire has many such houses. Here is one…

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 Now, here’s a flavour of Linden Manor:

Have you ever been so scared your soul left your body? 

All her life, Lesley Carpenter has been haunted by a gruesome nursery rhyme—“The Scottish Bride”—sung to her by her great grandmother. To find out more about its origins, Lesley visits the mysterious Isobel Warrender, the current hereditary owner of Linden Manor, a grand house with centuries of murky history surrounding it.

But her visit transforms into a nightmare when Lesley sees the ghost of the Scottish bride herself, a sight that, according to the rhyme, means certain death. The secrets of the house slowly reveal themselves to Lesley, terrible secrets of murder, evil and a curse that soaks the very earth on which Linden Manor now stands. But Linden Manor has saved its most chilling secret for last.

 LindenManor

Linden Manor is available from:

Samhain Publishing
Amazon.com
Amazon.co.uk
Amazon.ca
Amazon.com.au
Kobo

Omnilit
B&N

Author Catherine Cavendish, Biography~

Catherine CavendishCatherine Cavendish is joint winner of the Samhain Gothic Horror Anthology competition 2013. Her winning novella – Linden Manor – is now available in all digital formats and the print anthology will be published in October. She is the author of a number of paranormal horror and Gothic horror novellas and short stories. Her full length novel, Saving Grace Devine, will be published by Samhain Publishing in the summer.

She lives with a longsuffering husband and mildly eccentric tortoiseshell cat in North Wales. Her home is in a building dating back to the mid-8th century which is haunted by a friendly ghost, who announces her presence by footsteps, switching lights on and strange phenomena involving the washing machine and the TV.

When not slaving over a hot computer, Cat enjoys wandering around Neolithic stone circles and visiting old haunted houses.

www.catherinecavendish.com

https://www.facebook.com/CatherineCavendishWriter?ref=hl

http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/4961171.Catherine_Cavendish

http://twitter.com/#!/cat_cavendish

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Aaron Dries: Author, Filmmaker, Artist! Meet at Virtual Party for Release of A Place for Sinners

It’s the new wave!! Virtual parties!! For an author, it lets them reach all their friends and fans internationally!! How cool is that to be able to party across the miles??

In this upcoming case, for instance, of award winning horror author Aaron Dries who is from Australia, we all can’t pile in a car, a plane, a boat, and well….go for a two hour book signing party can we? We could, but that might get rather expensive.

So, we’ve got a fun VIRTUAL party you can drop by for on Hook of a Book Facebook page to help congratulate and celebrate Aaron’s new release from Samhain Horror, A Place for Sinners! We’ve got some books and an original piece of Aaron’s artwork to giveaway also, courtesy of Aaron. THANKS AARON!!

Here is the awesome cover, isn’t is gorgeous? Don’t be fooled, the book is SCARY and will leave breathless.

A Place for Sinners

You can read more about Aaron and his new book after the party details…..

DETAILS ABOUT PARTY

The virtual party sponsored by Hook of a Book (www.facebook.com/HookofaBook) page takes place on the actual wall of the Facebook page (not on the invite wall if you have a FB invite) from 9-11 p.m. US EST or 1 p.m. Australian time. The cool thing is that we’ll be talking across two days….I’d come just to say you accomplished being in Friday and Saturday at the same time….though you’ll leave which much more, like getting to know Aaron!

Attendees are able to ask Aaron any questions they want by PRE-ASKING or asking during the party via an email submission which will then be posted by the moderator to the Hook of a Book wall. Attendees can see questions answered and be able to comment.

Aaron is a wealth of knowledge on books, TV, film, art…..you genuinely don’t want to miss this chance to pick his brain. You’ll learn a lot and get some great opinions!

HOW TO ASK QUESTIONS

Please pre-ask questions using email listed below or Erin will also take limited questions during the party which will go in a queue to be asked in order received. Email Erin at hookofabook@hotmail.com (subject: Dries question). Again, emailing a question enters you or you can email just to enter to win.

The night of the event you can also inbox message Erin Al-Mehairi on the Hook of a Book Facebook page (below) if you can’t email and it will go into the queue.

Please, NO attendees should post questions to the wall of the party just because it gets too confusing. If questions appear on the wall, Erin will put in to the queue and then re-post the question as a status. Authors won’t answer those, but will wait for them to be re-posted and then answer. However, you can post to the wall to say congratulations and authors can comment on that too.

GIVEAWAY

We’re giving away some books too! Copies of choice of his books in e-format will be up for grabs. All that ask questions will have a chance to win or you can email to enter!

For the grandprize, the award is a signed paperback copy from Australia PLUS his original black and white artwork piece he drew for A Place for Sinners. That is a HUGE prize, right??!!

ARTWORK GIVEAWAY

The giveaway of the original painting created by Aaron, which is titled “They Closed In,” can be seen at the link. It’s black and white watercolors on paper. It depicts a scene from the first chapter of the book. See all his promo art for the book at the link…

http://www.aarondries.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=189540354

“Amity was trapped, her back flat against the cave wall. The dogs glared at her with candle-flame eyes, flickering with the potential to burn and cause pain. The dogs had claimed her as their own. Coveted her. Her blood was a sweetness they found favorable, and they were desperate for more.” – A PLACE FOR SINNERS by Aaron Dries

REFRESH YOUR BROWSER!

Please remember that refreshing your browser is very important to see all questions and answers ongoing during the event. Also remember to be patient. The moderator, Erin, is constantly working in the background and will be taking your emails, inbox messages, posting questions, and monitoring the party all at once.

You can RSVP or see more about the event here:

https://www.facebook.com/events/629992483758374/

You also have to “like” the Hook of a Book page here: www.facebook.com/HookofaBook

About Hook of Book Facebook Page

Like the Hook of a Book Facebook page at www.facebook.com/HookofaBook! We post reviews and interviews from this site there, but it also gives us the opportunity to talk books with you more, feature upcoming covers and releases, post free or discounted books, discuss literature, and showcase books we have on list to review.

Oh, for the Hook of a Book! Blog is an extension of Hook of a Book Services of Addison’s Compass Public Relations. We do book publicity, editing, proofreading, developmental consulting, media relations, press releases, and more.

A PLACE FOR SINNERS, SYNOPSIS

A Place for SinnersSometimes, survival is a sin.

Amity Collins has been deaf since she was seven. That was the day the wild dogs attacked, fighting for her bones. The day her father died. This trip to Thailand is exactly what Amity and her brother, Caleb, need—freedom… As their boat slits through saltwater, Amity, Caleb and the other passengers are having the time of their lives. They watch the island emerge on the horizon. Its trees twitch, as though impatient or hungry. Within its shadows, secrets best kept hidden will be unearthed. Sacrifices will be made. Terror will reach out to grasp Amity, as real and frightening as what’s lurking in the dark.

AARON DRIES, BIOGRAPHY

Aaron 1In 1984, Wes Craven unleashed Freddy Krueger on the world. That year also saw lonely children riding Luck Dragons in “The Neverending Story. And somewhere between these two pop culture events, there was the (relatively) unnoticed birth of a ginger-haired child. Aaron Dries.

Raised in a small New South Wales town in Australia, the former video store clerk, pizza delivery boy, retail specialist, aged-care nurse, document scanner, video editor, commissioned artist and amateur filmmaker always had a strong interest in creating stories. Were it hand-drawn X-Files comic books or home-made movies starring himself and his family (the best of which had Aaron running over a friend with a lawnmower, followed closely by a remake of “Scream” starring his brother as Drew Barrymore), there was always something in the works.

Aaron graduated from the University of Newcastle with a Bachelor of Communication under his wing, majoring in creative writing and video production. As a filmmaker, he won a number of awards for his short films at home and abroad, including Best Film at the Newcastle Film Festival for “Placebo,” coinciding with the publication of his earliest stories in literary magazines.

His first novel, HOUSE OF SIGHS was originally written under the title “Disunity” for the Leisure Books / Rue Morgue/ Chizine Publications FRESH BLOOD Contest. The premise of the novel stemmed back to a local murder that took place in Aaron’s adolescence. A mother on his pizza delivery route shot and murdered her husband and children before turning the gun upon herself. As was the case with everyone who read about the incident, Aaron’s mind churned with questions of morality. Why do bad things happen to good people? What is the origin of evil? What makes apparently sane people do insane acts? These questions would become the genesis for HOUSE OF SIGHS some years later.

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When he is not writing, Aaron Dries is thinking about writing, or upcoming film projects. He is also an avid traveler. The first draft of his debut was written over a three month period on a borrowed semi-functional laptop whilst living in overseas hostels.

People often ask Aaron, “Why horror? Why aim to terrify and disturb people?”

To this he has very little justification. “I guess I write horror because it pays better than jumping out from behind doors and scaring people- although I’ve got no plans to stop doing this either.” Aaron’s second book was the highly-acclaimed THE FALLEN BOYS, which was voted as one of the Best Horror Novels of 2013 by Fearnet.com, alongside works by Stephen King and Joe Hill. Also available is AND THE NIGHT GROWLED BACK, a disturbing novella set in the Icelandic wilderness. His third novel is A PLACE FOR SINNERS, which is garnering glowing praise.

Drop Aaron a line at www.aarondries.com. He won’t bite. Much.

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BOOK TRAILERS

Here is the link to his Youtube channel, which is where all of his book trailers and multimedia are kept. AND THEY ARE AWESOME!!!
http://www.youtube.com/user/aarondriesdisunity/videos

BUY LINKS

Samhain store Aaron Dries purchase link: http://store.samhainpublishing.com/aaron-dries-pa-1699.html

Get on discount in e-book and paperback for limited time!

Amazon author page with purchase links: http://www.amazon.com/Aaron-Dries/e/B008GXNU64

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Interview with the Interesting Catherine Cavendish on Writing Gothic Literature

Welcome Cat, my friend, to Oh, for the Hook of a Book! Our readers are sure to be delighted today as GOTHIC seems to be a hot topic in reading and writing these days on my site. Since your newest creation just released, called Linden Manor and part of a Samhain Horror Gothic novella series, you are in fine position to talk on the subject!

LindenManor

We are very happy to have you here with us! What has it been like to publish this work with Samhain, reaching us over yonder in the U.S. while you sit in Wales enjoying all kinds of historical goodness?

Cat: Samhain was on my publishing radar for a long time. I was just waiting for the right opportunity and when Don D’Auria (Executive Editor) announced the Gothic Anthology competition, it was like manna from heaven for me. It’s one of my absolute favourite horror genres and both our countries have such strong Gothic traditions, so it’s perfect for me.

Erin: I love gothic literature too, as you know! I am thirsting for more to be written and was so happy to hear Samhain take on publishing some. It was freezing in Ohio for so long, now today it feels 80. I won’t complain, but I will be drinking iced tea, with ice cubes….or how is the weather in Wales? How about I take a quick trip and we can take a walk around some old ruins. Do you drink hot tea or what is your drinking pleasure?

Cat: We’ve had some gorgeous spring days. Where I am – in North East Wales – we’ve been sheltered from most of the really awful weather this winter. I know it’s been terrible in parts of the USA, and in parts of Britain, whole communities have been flooded out.

As for old ruins…well, around here, on the border with England, we have a lot of castles. They were built by King Edward I in response to the uppity Welsh who would insist on mounting uprisings and trying to gain freedom and independence from England. Today, the political party Plaid Cymru has much the same agenda – although they don’t tend to mount uprisings!

Around four miles from where I am now is Rhuddlan Castle built on Edward’s instructions in 1277, but not completed until 1282, at the same time Flint Castle nearby was also being built for the same purpose.

Flint Castle Aerial North Castles Historic Sites

Flint Castle Aerial North Castles Historic Sites

Before we set off, I think a cup of Earl Grey tea, with a slice of lemon, will get us in the right mood.

Erin: I can’t ever pass up Earl Grey, it’s one of my favorites! Where are we going to head on our walk? Let’s get started and I’ll chat away with you while we explore.

Cat: I’d like to take you somewhere with a really creepy atmosphere. It’s not far from here, in a small town called Ruthin and it is the former gaol. A number of ghosts regularly linger there including prisoner John Jones who escaped twice – once in 1879 and then in 1913 when he was shot and died soon afterwards. Now he doesn’t seem able to leave.

Ruthin Gaol - condemned prisoner

Ruthin Gaol – condemned prisoner

William Kerr, Ruthin’s cruel and infamous Gaoler from 1871-1892, used to beat and starve prisoners as well as infuriate them by jangling his keys outside their cells. One day he simply disappeared, having left the Gaol on a perfectly normal day. No one knows what happened to him but his jangling keys and incessant banging on cell doors can still be heard today.

Then there’s William Hughes who was the last man to be hanged in the Gaol. He murdered his wife and on the 17th February 1903, six people watched him die for it. But he has never left…

Ruthin Gaol

Ruthin Gaol

Erin: Sounds lovely, well maybe not lovely, maybe a little spooky…ahaha…but I am game. As long as he doesn’t try to take me prisoner, so watch my back!! Now on to the questions….

Q: You just published your novella, Linden Manor, with Samhain Horror Publishing. Can you explain that process some and about how four novellas will be later published into one print anthology?

A: Samhain held their first Gothic Horror Anthology Competition last year. The rules were simple – it had to be Gothic, full of atmosphere, shadows, darkness and scares. There was a maximum word length 25,000-30,000 words and any combination of demons, ghosts and spooks of any kind could be used. I immediately set to work and that same day the germ of an idea which developed into Linden Manor was born.

My good friend, fellow horror writer and writing coach, Julia Kavan, helped me hone the story and I sent it off in good time for the September 15th deadline. When the email arrived from Don, saying, ‘Welcome to the Samhain family,’ my squeals of delight echoed off the walls and probably half way down the road!

On May 6, 2014, the four winning novellas were published in ebook format as standalones. In October we will all amalgamate in the print anthology. With Russell James, Devin Govaere and J.G. Faherty, I am in some stunning company. The entire anthology is called What Waits In The Shadows and I think that sums our stories up perfectly!

Four gothic tales

Q: What was your inspiration for Linden Manor? Talk about how you formulated your ideas!

A: I sat back, closed my eyes and let my mind drift. An image of a large Gothic house, set in its own land and isolated from its neighbours floated into my mind, along with a spooky little rhyme, quoted at the beginning of the story. It begins, ‘Run and hide, far and wide. Run and hide from the Scottish bride’. Everything just stemmed from there. Almost immediately, I knew I had to set the story in a rural landscape that had been populated for thousands of years. That led me to one of my favourite locations, the leafy and richly historic county of Wiltshire (where Stonehenge and Avebury are located). The mysterious character of Isobel Warrender formed before my main character, Lesley. While Lesley’s name never changed, Isobel began ‘life’ as Cynthia. Then I decided it simply didn’t suit her!

Q: What makes Linden Manor fit the genre of gothic? So many people are asking and discussing the definition of gothic lately. What do you feel encompasses gothic? How does your novella fit that?

A: Gothic to me, most often, evokes an old, imposing spooky house with a history. The house may or may not be a character in itself because it has soaked up so much tragedy or horror over the centuries, not just from its own existence but from what has gone before. The atmosphere is dark and gloomy, heavy with anticipation of something terrible to come. Nothing good is ever going to happen in such a house. It waits, it lurks, it harbours evil and may help it to thrive. It traps the innocent and unwary and sucks the lifeblood out of its victims. Here spirits walk, trapped in a timewarp, in a different dimension. Some may be seen, others not. Some are tragic, others deadly. Here demons thrive. Linden Manor is a house just like that.

Q: Do you think gothic literature is a new trend brought back by lovers of classic gothic of the past? Why do you think people are so interested in it?

A: I’m not convinced it ever went away. It’s a form of escapism – and let’s face it, we all need a bit of that. Some people escape into a nice, cozy murder mystery, others into a ‘happy ever after’ romance, but those of us with a love of being scared, thrilled, held in suspense, yet knowing no actual harm will come to us, love to lose ourselves in that dark atmosphere that epitomises gothic literature. It generates a delicious feeling of anticipation. We wonder, what waits in that shadow over there? There are also no guarantees that anyone will get out of this alive – or in one piece, either mentally or physically. It keeps us guessing right up to the last page – and even, sometimes beyond.

Q: What are some of the classic gothic literature that you can think of as examples? What are your favorites?

A: Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray, Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Robert Louis Stevenson’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Shirley Jackson’s the Haunting of Hill House and Susan Hill’s The Woman In Black spring to mind. Plus anything by M.R. James and Edgar Allan Poe. And let’s not forget Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre and her sister, Emily’s Wuthering Heights.

The Picture of Dorian Gray

The Picture of Dorian Gray

Q: You also have a penchant for ghosts and the paranormal? Does this fit into your novella as well, even though gothic reads don’t always have to have ghosts?

A: Oh yes. I love a good, frightening ghost, don’t you? Beware of the Scottish Bride…

Q: This is your first published work with Samhain, but you’ve been a writer for much longer. What other works have you written? Are they all in a similar genre or do you write various types of works?

A: Miss Abigail’s Room is probably my most Gothic until Linden Manor. The Second Wife too has many Gothic elements, as has a short story of mine called In My Lady’s Chamber. Cold Revenge and The Demons of Cambian Street are paranormal horror and my new novel, coming out on July 1st – Saving Grace Devine – is a horror with a timeslip.

MsAbigailsRoom_ByCatherineCavenish_200x300

Q: Have any real stories in Wales ever intrigued you enough that you wrote any stories about them? Why or why not?

A: There is a rich literary tradition in Wales – although I have not lived here for very long, so am still on a learning curve. There are many haunted properties and stories, so I look forward to exploring those for the future.

Q: I hear you have a ghost lives near you or in your own home? What is that like??!

A: She’s benevolent. Fortunately. The building in which our apartment is located is at least 250 years old, so you would expect it to have seen a fair amount of activity over the years. It would appear that our ghost is probably a lady called Miss Edwards who owned a haberdashery shop on the premises in the early part of the 20th century. She switches on lights and there was a spooky incident involving the washing machine once, which seemed to be her trying to get our attention. My husband has heard footsteps upstairs, when no one but him was there, and he has also heard her voice. I get a little shiver up my spine when things happen, but as long as my cat doesn’t get scared, neither do I!

Q: Is it difficult to find a ghosts “voice” when writing a novel? How do you put yourself into their shoes, so to speak (even if they don’t wear shoes!!)?

A: I create a backstory for the ghost just as I would a living character. Very little of that will appear in the story, but it will have everything to do with their actions, appearance and motivation for haunting.

Q: What kinds of methods do you use or details to create ominous and foreboding scenes?

A: I vary the length of sentences. Short. Choppy. Phrases rather than whole sentences, when I want to raise the tension. I describe what I see, taking care to use descriptive verbs wherever possible without resorting to overuse of adjectives or adverbs. And I describe what I see in my head. It’s a dark place at times!

Q: What else do you have upcoming in the way of any released books? You mentioned you have a new book coming from Samhain Horror, a full novel, in July?

A: Saving Grace Devine on July 1st. Yes, I’m really looking forward to it. I’ll read you the blurb, which should give you a basic flavour of the story:

Can the living help the dead…and at what cost? 

When Alex Fletcher finds a painting of a drowned girl, she’s unnerved. When the girl in the painting opens her eyes, she is terrified. And when the girl appears to her as an apparition and begs her for help, Alex can’t refuse.

But as she digs further into Grace’s past, she is embroiled in supernatural forces she cannot control, and a timeslip back to 1912 brings her face to face with the man who killed Grace and the demonic spirit of his long-dead mother. With such nightmarish forces stacked against her, Alex’s options are few. Somehow she must save Grace, but to do so, she must pay an unimaginable price.

SavingGraceDevine72lg

Q: Do you feel that women in the horror genre have had a harder time getting published or noticed than men? Now or in the past? If so, are things gradually getting better? How hard do women need to fight to be noticed?

A: I think there are some excellent female horror authors – Susan Hill, I’ve already mentioned, although she is more accurately a multi-genre author, as was Daphne Du Maurier. Anne Rice is another major influence. There does seem to be an increasing number of excellent new voices in horror, who happen to be female. Julia Kavan, Lisa Morton, Sèphera Girón…the list grows.

Then, of course, the winning novellas in Samhain’s competition comprised two female authors and two male. I think that the success of authors such as Stephanie Meyer may possibly have led to some expectation that a woman will tend towards the ‘sparkly vampire’ type of paranormal, but there are plenty of us shouting our horror corner these days. The Horror Writers’ Association, and publishers such as Samhain really help. As they say, ‘It’s all about the story’. Write one that ticks all the boxes and it doesn’t matter which sex you are (at least, that’s my experience).

Q: What words of advice do you have for other writers? What have you found works best for you in terms of plotting your story or finding time to write?

A: First of all, it may be a cliché, but a writer writes. Only by practice do we get better. And read. Your genre, yes, but anything and everything – if it’s well written, or even if it isn’t. Analyze what works and what doesn’t, then apply the lessons learned to your own writing. Get a mentor/coach/fellow writer in your chosen genre who has the experience and can be trusted to give you honest, constructive feedback. Don’t be precious about those paragraphs/pages you slaved over. If they don’t work, out they come! I am not a great plotter and I use my regular walks down by the river as valuable thinking time. I also carry a notebook with me to jot down ideas, words, phrases that I might use, wherever I might be at the time. If you try and find time to write, you never will. You have to make time, and that usually means doing less of something else, be it housework or watching TV. It’s all about prioritizing. If you work full time, you’ll need to claw back time on your days off, write in your lunchtimes if you have them. Grab an hour at night before you go to bed. Whatever works for you. But do it!

Q: Do you have any more books in process at the moment? If so, tell us about them. What do you plan to write in the future?

A: I have one tentatively called Jane, Avenged. It’s about to undergo a second draft and, is taking shape. Then I also have an idea borne out of a nightmare (much as Saving Grace Devine was). No title yet for this one, but it involves a small, locked up house in a wood…

Q: What do you feel have been your biggest challenges as a writer and on the flip side, your biggest success?

A: My biggest challenge to date has undoubtedly been finding an active, well respected publisher of horror. My greatest success was finding one – and winning the competition!

Q: What are some places you’d enjoy traveling to? Any you’ve been to? And any you’d like to try to see one day?

A: We’re going to Pompeii, Herculaneum and Paestum very soon. I’ve always wanted to go there as I love history – the older the better! Visiting the ancient palaces of Egypt was an amazing experience. I also love taking holidays to interesting prehistoric sites in Orkney and Wiltshire. Still on my ‘bucket’ list is St. Petersburg as I have a fascination for the last Tsar and his family.

St. Petersburg

St. Petersburg

Q: How can readers connect to you, Cat?

A: I can be found on my website: www.catherinecavendish.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CatherineCavendishWriter?ref=hl

Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/4961171.Catherine_Cavendish

Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/cat_cavendish

Erin: Thank you SO MUCH for having me over to chat. You’ve worn me out with the tour. We’ll have to do this again and next time, we’ll bring a thermos of tea! Best wishes with your novella and upcoming works and please stop by again soon. Thanks so much for being such an amazing supporter of Hook of a Book!

Cat: Thank you so much for letting me haunt your blog today, Erin. I’ve really enjoyed it. Ooh, and Miss Edwards just said, “Bore da” (Welsh for “Good morning”).

Linden Manor, Synopsis~

LindenManorHave you ever been so scared your soul left your body? 

All her life, Lesley Carpenter has been haunted by a gruesome nursery rhyme—“The Scottish Bride”—sung to her by her great grandmother. To find out more about its origins, Lesley visits the mysterious Isobel Warrender, the current hereditary owner of Linden Manor, a grand house with centuries of murky history surrounding it.

But her visit transforms into a nightmare when Lesley sees the ghost of the Scottish bride herself, a sight that, according to the rhyme, means certain death. The secrets of the house slowly reveal themselves to Lesley, terrible secrets of murder, evil and a curse that soaks the very earth on which Linden Manor now stands. But Linden Manor has saved its most chilling secret for last.

AMAZON

SAMHAIN PUBLISHING (get for $2.45 for limited time!)

Saving Grace Devine, Synopsis~
Available July 1, 2014

SavingGraceDevine72lgCan the living help the dead…and at what cost?

When Alex Fletcher finds a painting of a drowned girl, she’s unnerved. When the girl in the painting opens her eyes, she is terrified. And when the girl appears to her as an apparition and begs her for help, Alex can’t refuse.

But as she digs further into Grace’s past, she is embroiled in supernatural forces she cannot control, and a timeslip back to 1912 brings her face to face with the man who killed Grace and the demonic spirit of his long-dead mother. With such nightmarish forces stacked against her, Alex’s options are few. Somehow she must save Grace, but to do so, she must pay an unimaginable price.

Saving Grace Devine will be published on July 1st and is available for pre-order now at:

Samhain Publishing

Amazon.com 

Amazon.co.uk 

Amazon.ca 

Amazon.com.au 

B&N 

Kobo

Catherine Cavendish, Biography~

Catherine CavendishHello, my name’s Catherine Cavendish and I write (mainly) paranormal horror fiction.

I am delighted to announce that I am joint winner of the first annual Samhain Horror Anthology Competition with my new Gothic horror novella, LINDEN MANOR.This will be followed by my novel SAVING GRACE DEVINE in the summer, also to be published by Samhain Horror.

My current titles include: THE SECOND WIFE, MISS ABIGAIL’S ROOM, THE DEVIL INSIDE HER, THE DEMONS OF CAMBIAN STREET, COLD REVENGE, THE DUST STORM, SAY A LITTLE PRAYER, and IN MY LADY’S CHAMBER.  All are available from most online booksellers.

I live with a longsuffering husband and mildly eccentric tortoiseshell cat in North Wales. Our home is in a building dating back to the mid 18th century which is haunted by a friendly ghost, who announces her presence by footsteps, switching lights on and strange phenomena involving the washing machine and the TV.

When not slaving over a hot computer, I enjoy wandering around Neolithic stone circles and visiting old haunted houses.

Check out my website at: www.catherinecavendish.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CatherineCavendishWriter?ref=hl

Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/4961171.Catherine_Cavendish

Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/cat_cavendish

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Like Chilling Horror? Cheer for Giveaways? Virtual Book Launch Party for David Bernstein and Adam Cesare!

You’re most likely strolling through Facebook in the evening right? Posting your favorite book, cartoon, and chatting with friends in between watching a cool show or settling down for the evening? We’ve got a fun VIRTUAL party you can drop by for as well to help congratulate and celebrate horror authors David Bernstein and Adam Cesare’s newest releases! We’ve got some books to giveaway also so be sure to enter to win, courtesy of David and Adam!

DETAILS ABOUT PARTY:

The virtual party sponsored by Hook of a Book (www.facebook.com/HookofaBook) page takes place on the actual wall of the Facebook page (not on the invite wall if you have a FB invite) from 9 to 11 p.m. EST, on Thursday, Jan 16, 2014.

Attendees are able to ask David or Adam any questions they want by PRE-ASKING or asking during the party via an email submission which will then be posted by the moderator to the Hook of a Book wall. E-mail to me at hookofabook@hotmail.com.  Attendees can see questions answered and be able to comment. These two authors are fun and interesting so you won’t want to miss the action.

HOW TO ASK QUESTIONS:

Again, please pre-ask questions using email listed below or Erin will also take limited questions during the party which will go in a queue to be asked in order received. Email Erin at to hookofabook@hotmail.com (subject: Dave or Adam question).  Emailing a question enters you or you can email just to enter to win.

The night of the event you can also inbox message Erin Al-Mehairi on the Hook of a Book Facebook page (below) if you can’t email and it will go into the queue.

Please, NO attendees should post questions to the wall of the party just because it gets too confusing. If questions appear on the wall, Erin will put in to the queue and then re-post the question as a status. Authors won’t answer those, but will wait for them to be re-posted and then answer. However, you can post to the wall to say congratulations and authors can comment on that too.

We’re giving away 10 books, one print copy of Amongst the Dead from David and The Summer Job from Adam and four e-books from each, your choice of their titles! All that ask questions will have a chance to win or you can email to enter! Or just hang out and have conversation in the comments.

REFRESH YOUR BROWSER!

Please remember that refreshing your browser is very important to see all questions and answers ongoing during the event. Also remember to be patient. The moderator, me (Erin), is constantly working in the background and will be taking your emails, inbox messages, posting questions, and monitoring the party all at once.

You can RSVP or see more about the event here:

https://www.facebook.com/events/629267487136823/

You also have to “like” the Hook of a Book page here: www.facebook.com/HookofaBook

About Hook of Book Facebook Page~

Like the Hook of a Book Facebook page at www.facebook.com/HookofaBook! We post reviews and interviews from this site there, but it also gives us the opportunity to talk books with you more, feature upcoming covers and releases, post free or discounted books, discuss literature, and showcase books we have on list to review. We’ll talk about the book, publishing and writing industry. We’ll probably also talk grammar tips and ask lots of questions, as well as post interesting historical articles, art, photos, and other things we find intriguing.

Oh, for the Hook of a Book! Blog is an extension of Hook of a Book Services of Addison’s Compass Public Relations. We do book publicity, editing, proofreading, draft consulting, media relations, press releases and more.

If you are interested in your own Facebook Launch Party at Hook of a Book, please e-mail!

ABOUT David and Adam~

David Bernstein, Biography

dave! lol 043David Bernstein is a dark fiction/horror writer who lives in NYC, but is originally from upstate NY and loves the countryside. His novels and novellas include The Tree Man, Damaged Souls, Amongst the Dead, Tears of No Return, Machines of the Dead, and the Bizarro title Fecal Terror.

He writes like a madman and this year (2104) has books coming from the Samhain Horror line—Witch Island and Apartment 7C, and from DarkFuse, the titles Relic of Death and Surrogate, and from SeveredPress, the third installment of the Machines of the Dead trilogy. He loves hearing from his readers, so drop him a review, send him an email, or contact him on Facebook.

You can check out his blog and information at http://davidbernsteinauthor.blogspot.com/

The Tree Man, Synopsis—

TreeMan-The72lgCan two kids alone stop a monstrous evil?

Women and children have been mysteriously disappearing from Evan’s town. And now Evan may know why. He was climbing a tree in the woods when he saw a decrepit old man toss a helpless woman into the mouth of a hideous tree-like creature.

Evan knows he can’t stop the man and the creature by himself, but he also knows no one will believe a kid with such a wild story. Only his best friend, Peter, can help him confront this terrifying evil. But if they aren’t careful, they will soon be missing too.

Samhain Purchase:

http://store.samhainpublishing.com/The-Tree-Man-p-73164.html

Amazon Purchase:

http://www.amazon.com/The-Tree-Man-David-Bernstein-ebook/dp/B00H54X8IK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1389674777&sr=8-1&keywords=the+tree+man

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Adam Cesare, Biography~

cesareAdam Cesare is a New Yorker who lives in Philadelphia. He studied English and film at Boston University.

His books include Video Night, The Summer Job and Tribesmen. His nonfiction has appeared in Paracinema, Fangoria, The LA Review of Books and other venues.

You can check him out at: http://adamcesare.wordpress.com/


The Summer Job, Synopsis—

Welcome to Mission, Massachusetts. Praying won’t save you, but it couldn’t hurt.

Claire is an alternative girl looking for an alternative. Her post-college prospects have fizzled and she’s looking for a new job, a new town, a whole new life. A summer position at a remote hotel may be just what she needs.

SummerJob-The72smVery soon, though, she begins to suspect the hotel may have decidedly sinister motives. At the same time she falls back into her old wild ways with the young people of the town, a radical group totally at odds with the sinister leaders of a local cult. Caught between two worlds, Claire has to plot her escape while spiraling deeper into a nightmare of ritual sacrifice and killer parties.

Samhain Purchase:

http://store.samhainpublishing.com/the-summer-job-p-73163.html


Amazon Purchase:

http://www.amazon.com/The-Summer-Job-Adam-Cesare/dp/1619218127

You can also order books from the info detailed in the notes section on the Facebook page during or anytime after the party (30% off at Samhain link there for a limited time) or enter the giveaways.

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Damaged Souls by David Bernstein is a Gothic, Sinister Tale Full of Depth

Damaged SoulsDamaged Souls is the first novel by David Bernstein that I’ve read and it was so fantastic, it certainly won’t be my last. I heard some of his past titles were excellent, but he has an immense amount of work coming out in 2014 too! Damaged Souls was the perfect novel for me to start with as I love gothic, dark, and sinister tales dealing with demons and well…eerie candlelight. I love candlelight. I mean even the cover alludes to a vintage horror creeping into modern society.

Munyok is a demon being pursued in NYC, but he’s quickly sent back to hell. We won’t see the last of him though as he vows to fight his way back. Meanwhile, a traffic accident changes the life of John Crawford. His life becomes a living hell and he’s offered a deal. You know those ominous life or death deals that happen in all the good vs. evil stories. You’ll have to read the book to see if John can stop the gates of hell from opening…and you’ll really want to know as your flipping pages faster and faster with a speed you didn’t know you could read at. You’ll feel the story spinning out of control as John’s life spins out of control, but soon Bernstein centers us again and keeps us focused with action.

This novel reminds me of some of Stephen King’s short stories, with more length added to it, and a more supernatural like demon(s) that we don’t always see in the form of a human. There are some parts that are horrifying, but they always fit in the story line and your gut is already so tore up emotionally that really any real blood shed just whizzes by as the story sucks you in mentally and physically.

I tore through this novel in one whole night. I was really impressed by Bernstein’s writing and his grasp on the full gamut of human, and underworld, emotions. Definitely haunting, it also lets you take a long look at the choices made in life and what the outcomes might be from them. Horrible things happen in every day life and Bernstein takes it a step further by demonizing it and creating a phenomenal hero who overcomes the odds and tries to save the world.

I HIGHLY recommend Damaged Souls and I hope that David keeps writing such gut-wrenching, heart-tugging, and largely dimensional characters who are exploring their role in the world and their emotional make-up. This is a great “any time” read, but I certainly recommend for those long Fall and Winter days and nights when you can snuggle under a blanket, light a candle, and read deep into the night.

Damaged Souls, Synopsis~

Damaged SoulsOnly he can stop the gates of Hell from opening wide.

John Crawford wasn’t able to deal with the pain and took the easy way out. At least he thought he did. Instead, he’s been offered a deal by a nightmarish creature and given a second chance at life. But he’s no longer human. And he’s been assigned an impossible task. He must kill a demon before it opens the gates of Hell and brings about the apocalypse. If John succeeds, the human race will be safe and he can become human again. If he fails, mankind will perish and he will be lost for all eternity.

David Bernstein, Biography~

dave! lol 043David Bernstein is a dark fiction/horror writer who lives in NYC, but is originally from upstate NY and loves the countryside. His novels and novellas include The Tree Man, Damaged Souls, Amongst the Dead, Tears of No Return, Machines of the Dead, and the Bizarro title Fecal Terror.

He writes like a madman and this year (2104) has books coming from the Samhain Horror line–Witch Island and Apartment 7C, and from DarkFuse, the titles Relic of Death and Surrogate, and from Severed Press, the third installment of the Machines of the Dead trilogy. He loves hearing from his readers, so drop him a review, send him an email, or contact him on Facebook.

You can check out his blog and information at http://davidbernsteinauthor.blogspot.com/

More News~

Next up for David is a novella, also published by Samhain Horror, call The Tree Man. It just went on sale the first week of January and has some rave reviews. I’ll be putting up a review of that here within the next few days in accordance with a Facebook launch party I’m having for David and another horror author Adam Cesare. Mark your calendars for Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 from 9-11 p.m. EST and watch this blog for more details or go to http://www.facebook.com/HookofaBook.

Here’s The Tree Man Synopsis~

TreeMan-The72lgCan two kids alone stop a monstrous evil?

Women and children have been mysteriously disappearing from Evan’s town. And now Evan may know why. He was climbing a tree in the woods when he saw a decrepit old man toss a helpless woman into the mouth of a hideous tree-like creature.

Evan knows he can’t stop the man and the creature by himself, but he also knows no one will believe a kid with such a wild story. Only his best friend, Peter, can help him confront this terrifying evil. But if they aren’t careful, they will soon be missing too.

At 84 pages, it’s a quick read, so there’s no reason to pick up a good read you can have with for an hour or two.

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The Novel I’ve Been Waiting All Year to Come Out! The Devil’s Woods by Brian Moreland is Here!

The Devil’s Woods, by my friend and best-selling, award-winning author Brian Moreland, has finally released today, Dec. 3!! It’s been a novel he’s wanted to publish for 25 years, and for me, it’s been a year and a half since I first pre-read it for him! I can only imagine his excitement to share this novel with readers, as I know how stoked I’ve been just this last year as I waited for this publishing day!! Check out the cover, then keep reading below.

dw

I know you all will LOVE this book. It has elements of Native American/First People legends (and modern-day reservation locale and characters), eerie woods, history, supernatural, romance, redemption and revenge, and the good versus evil battle!! What I like most about Brian’s books is that his hero/heroine always shines through. His main character of Kyle has stayed with me in my head and I’ve dealt with an urge to beg Brian to give me another story featuring Kyle. I loved that character, I bet you will also.

Brian takes his readers through ups and downs, twists and turns, horrible endings for some, and redemption for others, but he always lets the good win out. For me, I appreciate that.

I’ll have my professional review up of The Devil’s Woods (but believe me it is 5 star and one of his best) soon, plus an interview and maybe some other cool things to get you interested in the book and the author behind the book.  Check out what the book’s about and see the exclusive sample…coming right below!

The Devil’s Woods, Synopsis~

Deep within the Canadian wilderness, people have been disappearing for a century. There is a place the locals call “the Devil’s Woods.” It is a place so evil that even animals avoid it. When their father’s expedition team goes missing, Kyle and his brother and sister return to the Cree reservation where they were born. Kyle can see ghosts that haunt the woods surrounding the village—and they are trying to warn him.  The search for their father will lead Kyle and his siblings to the legendary forest, where their mission will become a fight for survival.

If it sounds good so far, purchase today for Kindle or in Paperback (nice matte smooth cover, a keepsake) at the links below. Check out this exclusive section from the book first though, you won’t see this sample anywhere else!!!

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EXCLUSIVE SNEAK PEEK AT A PORTION OF THE DEVIL’S WOODS~

At Kakaskitewak Swamp, Kyle felt a knot in his stomach as he stared across the black water at the pines covered with animal skulls. These trees gave off the same humming vibration as the forest yesterday where he’d rescued Chaser. Kyle wondered if he were to touch those totem poles what secrets they would tell. He reached down and grabbed the canoe’s rope. “I’m going to paddle over.”

Ray grabbed his arm. “It’s forbidden.”

“Why?”

“It’s sacred Cree law.”

Kyle remembered the warnings the elders used to say to the kids, If you go past Kakaskitewak Swamp, the woods will snatch you. “Why has our tribe always been afraid of this place?”

Ray stared across the swamp. “Macâya Forest is like a living thing that feeds on whoever enters it. It happened to Hagen Thorpe’s lumberjacks over a century ago. And it’s happened to a few members of our tribe since. Grandfather lost his brother to those woods. He says it was the Macâya that got him.”

“Some kind of devil creature?”

“I don’t know what it is.” Ray stared at the black pines. “But it’s not an animal.”

At the opposite bank, Kyle thought he saw something move behind the trees, a flash of gray, but when he blinked it was gone.

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LINKS to PURCHASE~

Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/The-Devils-Woods-Brian-Moreland/dp/product-description/1619215659/ref=dp_proddesc_0/178-1669034-3473368?ie=UTF8&n=283155&s=books

Barnes and Noble:

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-devils-woods-brian-moreland/1114776789

Samhain Publishing/Horror:

http://store.samhainpublishing.com/devils-woods-p-73127.html?osCsid=d84e40d26d2ade7a2e631f26c5469595

Brian Moreland, Biography~

368_Facebook_authorBrian Moreland is a best-selling and award-winning author of novels and short stories in the horror and supernatural suspense genre. In 2007, his novel Shadows in the Mist, a Nazi occult thriller set during World War II, won a gold medal for Best Horror Novel in an international contest. The novel went on to be published in Austria and Germany under the title Schattenkrieger.

Shadows in the Mist and Dead of Winter are currently available, as well as his Kindle short-story The Girl from the Blood Coven and the novella it led into that he released this summer, The Witching House.  Now, he has released the full-length The Devil’s Woods. His next novella, Vagrants, releases in 2014.

He loves hiking, kayaking, watching sports, dancing, and eating cookies. Brian lives in Dallas, Texas where he is diligently writing his next horror novel.  When not working on his books or books for other writers, Brian edits documentaries and TV commercials around the globe. He produced a World War II documentary in Normandy, France, and worked at two military bases in Iraq with a film crew.

Brian lives in Dallas, Texas. You can communicate with him online at www.brianmoreland.com or catch him at an upcoming book signing or Horror Con.

Connect~

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/HorrorAuthorBrianMoreland

Twitter: @BrianMoreland

Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/1150022.Brian_Moreland

Brian’s Horror Fiction blog: http://www.brianmoreland.blogspot.com

Coaching for Writers blog:  http://www.coachingforwriters.blogspot.com

Just for Fun~

Here’s the acknowledgement Brian gave me in the front of The Devil’s Woods:

Ack DW

Here’s Brian and I at HorrorHound in February 2013:

me and Brian

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Filed under Book Reviews, Feature Articles, New Books I've Found

Interview with Jonathan Moore about His Debut of Redheads, How He Writes, and His Love of Sailing

Today, I finally have my interview up with Jonathan Moore, author of Redheads, after technical difficulties last week during his launch! I’ve been dying to share it with you, as I feel Jonathan is a new author who is one to watch! If you like horror, crime, thrillers, serial killer dramas, supernatural twists, or just great literature, this book is one you must read for yourself.

You can read my review HERE if you’re curious about my thoughts on the book! But set aside some time this weekend and check out our interview, we get in-depth about his work and genres and he shares some beautiful photos of his boat in Hawaii…oh, we went sailing, didn’t you know? *in my dreams*

Redheads

 

Hi, Jonathan! Welcome to Oh, for the Hook of a Book! I’m so excited to have you here to talk about your debut novel, Redheads, as well as to introduce you to other authors and readers! What did it feel like for you to release your first book last week (Nov. 5, 2013)?

Jonathan:   Hi Erin, thanks for having me.  This is a great blog, and I’ve been following it for a while now.  Watching my book release felt great—it was something I’ve been working towards for a long time, so seeing it come together was thrilling.  The whole publishing process, in fact, has been great fun.

Erin: Thanks for following and I’m so glad you enjoy it! It’s snowing and cold here, so I definitely want to come where you are!  Let’s take a ride on the boat, drink some coffee, and discuss while I get tan in your warm Hawaii environment! I need some sun about now (Ohio doesn’t have that every day!)!

Jonathan: Get yourself settled in.  If you want something stronger than coffee, I keep cold beer on the boat, and there may be a bottle of rum in the freezer.  The boat’s name, by the way, is Pez Vela, and she’s been a good friend for a while now.  In fact, she helped me get this novel going.  Here’s a picture of her in Pokai Bay:

boat

Erin: The boat is lovely and the water inviting! Ah, I’ll have the rum with some coke, or if it is coconut rum (my fave) I’ll have with Sprite! *smile*

Q:  I know you’ve been a man of many talents career wise over your young life. Normally, knowing you now work as an attorney, I’d ask how you made the switch to writing, but I also know you used to be an English teacher! So how about you tell how writing started for you, why you chose to become a lawyer, and then why you took the dive back into a creative profession?

A: This is going to be a really long answer, so if you haven’t grabbed a beer yet, now would be a good time.

Erin: Thanks for pouring me a second of that rum…I’m all ears!

I’ve always wanted to be a writer.  From the time I was a kid—in fact, before I could spell—I’d write stories.  My first stories, when I was in kindergarten, were about a dog and a snake who were friends.  I’d like to think my stories have gotten better, or at least more complicated, since then. 

In high school, I bugged out of Central Texas as soon as I could, and went to Interlochen Arts Academy, in Michigan, where I majored in creative writing.  Interlochen is mostly known as a music school, but its creative writing program was top notch—I mean, seriously, what other high school even has a full-fledged creative writing major?

In fact, Interlochen was so great, it almost set me up to fail in college.  I dropped out of more undergraduate colleges than I’d care to mention before I found one in San Francisco that left me alone and let me write.  That was the New College of California, which sadly no longer exists.   

I graduated in 2001 with a degree in creative writing, and (unsurprisingly) no job prospects whatsoever.   I had this half-baked idea that if I studied a foreign language, I might improve my writing style by getting a different perspective on language.  So I moved to Taiwan and found a job teaching kindergarten, and spent my spare time studying Mandarin.  On the side, I tutored adults, taught high school classes, and started a Tex-Mex restaurant.  It was all good fun, but at some point I realized that with my particular skill set—i.e., making stuff up and writing it down—I’d be a great lawyer.  I went to Tulane Law School, in New Orleans.

I met my wife in law school, and she and I moved to Honolulu together after we graduated, in 2007.  Eventually we both got great jobs in the same law firm, and as things settled down, we bought the boat you and I are sitting on now—Pez Vela.

I hadn’t written anything creative in years, but Pez Vela unlocked something in me.  Here was this vessel that had been floating around the world’s oceans for years—when we bought her and cleaned her out, Maria found Thai bahts from the 1970s in the bilge—and whenever I stepped aboard and sat in her saloon, I felt this sense of history and adventure.  I’d felt  the same thing before, when I was writing regularly.  I wanted that again.  So eventually, I’d stop by the marina on my way home from work, light the oil lamp in the saloon, and sit at the table to write.

Redheads came out of that.

Erin: That is amazing! I love how your connection with the water and your boat, annd your love of books probably too, helped you reach inside yourself to challenge and pursue your writing dream!

Q:  Redheads is your first novel to be published and went live Nov. 5, published by Samhain Publishing. In your own words, can you tell us what your novel is about and where you came up with the idea of such a dastardly killer?

A:  Redheads started as a story about love and loss, and ended up as a revenge tale.  That’s probably a natural progression of human emotions, so I’m happy with it.  It’s about a man whose wife was murdered six years before the book begins.  The murder was brutal—Cheryl Wilcox was raped and eaten alive—but the police never even came close to solving it.  So Chris Wilcox rededicates his life to finding the killer.  Along the way, he discovers a bloody trail of similar, unsolved crimes, and he teams up with two other people who have lost loved ones.

When it comes to the killer in this story, there’s a bit of a twist.  I wanted to get out of my comfort zone and write something I’d never written before—and maybe in the process create something other people would pay to read.  So yes, the killer is dastardly.  This isn’t your grandfather’s Silence of the Lambs—which, by the way, is a great novel, but Thomas Harris already wrote it, and it didn’t need to be written again.

Erin: Yes, definitely for those who like the Hannibal story, but I think even MORE scary with a great twist! I also noted that in your love story within the book, I found myself thinking, even in something so bad that happened to those two, they still found love and happiness, so that out of something horrible came something good…

Q:  Your book is loaded with technical information, from police procedure, criminal behavior, technology, surveillance, etc. How did you research or come to know all this information in such a precise manner? Did you mean to write the book in this format or did it just happen this way naturally?

A:  The technical information in Redheads was a lot of fun to write.  Most writers probably have a panel of go-to people for asking all kinds of weird questions.  I’m truly fortunate, because my dad is a top-flight computer scientist, my mom worked in pharmaceutical design, my sister has a Ph.D. in ecology, my stepbrother is a commercial pilot, and my best friend is a cardiologist.  From my own job, I had easy access to learning all kinds of things about police and F.B.I. procedures, and legal issues that came up.  It was a lot of fun.

It was also totally unexpected.  My two favorite writers are Cormac McCarthy and Ernest Hemingway.   But I challenge you to imagine either Hemingway or McCarthy ever writing anything that involved DNA sequencing, computer hacking, or biometrics. 

It’s not that they couldn’t do it—clearly, either of them are capable of writing anything—it’s that those things aren’t (or weren’t, in Hemingway’s case) a part of their particular aesthetic.  When you read McCarthy and Hemingway, the natural world has huge, beautiful resonance, and comes at you uncluttered by modernity.  High tech information would just look like litter on the mountain trail.

But to tell this particular story, I couldn’t ignore that stuff.  DNA, computers, biometrics and joint intelligence task forces might not have been part of Hemingway’s artistic universe, but these were all necessary to the palette of Redheads.  And when I started writing about them, I discovered my own voice.  It was a great feeling.

Erin: So many men who write action and horror tell me they are Hemingway fans (me, I just was so tired of the bullfighting and prefer Fitzgerald)! My friend, horror author Hunter Shea, said that Hemingway helped him learn to write his action sequences. But yes, modern technology is so far advanced beyond anything anyone (other than some sci-fi authors) might have envisioned. You certainly did seem to take all the elements of things you enjoyed or were knowledgeable about and turn them into a thrill ride of a book.

Q:  How long did it take you to write Redheads? How many drafts to make sure all that detail was sewn up and loose ends completed? It seems when you get precise with details it lends also to find more fault, though in your book I didn’t seem to catch any. Did you find yourself revisiting the draft often to ensure all the technical aspects were logical?

A:  I spent thirteen months writing Redheads.  A lot of that was down time, where I was caught up with work and not writing anything at all.  I then went through several drafts while I was trying to get the thing published.  One editor, Mallory Braus, was interested enough to send me a detailed letter suggesting revisions and inviting me to resubmit.  I made the changes, but she still felt it wasn’t right for her line.  After that rejection, I took another look at her letter and did some further revisions, and that was when I found Don D’Auria, my editor at Samhain.

Erin: Honestly, I would have guessed it took you much longer! There is so much technical detail!

Q:  How did you decide to put in the supernatural element (without giving too much away of course!)? It felt very gothic by the end? That was a cool mixing of styles.

A:  Thanks!  You can call it supernatural, or science fiction, or anything else you want.  I’m not too concerned with labels.  But I decided to take the story in this direction because I wanted to push some boundaries and write something that was out the ordinary.  It was a question of “What if…?”  So it was an experiment for me, but I think it worked.  I sincerely hope readers think so, too.

Erin: I try to label everything, I am in marketing…haha! People like to identify with a product before buying it. Putting a science fiction label on it would be wrong and probably turn readers away who would normally buy it! You’re right though, it worked. So I’ll just call it what I want to….a crime thriller with a gothic twist.

Q:  Your works have been compared on some level to some very best-selling authors. Though I know everyone is an original, who do you feel best aligns with your own writing on this novel? Who are your own favorite authors and why?

A:  I love those comparisons.  Please keep them coming.  Some other super-popular writers I wouldn’t mind being compared to are: Stephen King, Michael Connelly, Elmore Leonard and Dennis Lehane.  Tell me I write like one of those guys and I’ll spend the whole day gloating over it and posting it on Facebook.

Q:  Do you consider yourself in the thriller, crime, suspense, or horror genres? Or all? Explain your answer please.

A:  I’ll follow the story wherever it goes, so I guess I’ll write in any genre that fits.  I don’t dislike genre labels—they can be very useful for marketing—but I don’t consider myself as belonging to one group and not another.  That said, I think Redheads is right at home in all sorts of genres.  It is a crime story, because there is a crime at its heart, and it delves into the procedures of solving it.  It’s a thriller, because there is so much at stake for the characters, and there is a ticking clock to find the killer before he devours the next victim (or one of the main characters).  It’s a horror novel because—let’s face it—when you have young women getting eaten, that’s a horrible thing no matter how you tell it.  It was published by a horror publisher, but I don’t think that limits this story in any way.

Erin: Your answer was what I was looking for. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not trying to fit you into one genre only, just trying to allow readers to get a feel on if they’d enjoy this type of book. Many people say to me that they could never read horror, but then they’ve been reading books on serial killers, crime, and the like. Readers get confused and I’m on a mission to inform them better so that more authors get more books sold to the right people. *smile*

Q:  Do you feel that more of the aforementioned are crossing boundaries with each other? Is horror being redefined?

A:  I honestly don’t know.  Like I said, I don’t mind genre labels, but I’m not attached to them in any way, so I don’t think a lot about definitions.  Does Stephen King write horror?  It depends who you ask.  He’s a beautiful stylist, and his novel It is a great example of a literary novel disguised as a horror novel.  Or take Cormac McCarthy—Child of God is probably the creepiest horror novel ever written, but establishment critics like Harold Bloom (who are paid to know these things) say McCarthy is the heir to William Faulkner.  So my feeling is that genre labels are simply useful for marketing—they tell you this is a book you might like, because it is sort of like other books you liked.  But that’s all they tell you; they don’t say anything about what a book actually is.

Q:  What other kinds of writing are in the works for you? Do you have another novel for us to look forward to?

A:  My agent recently sold my second novel to Random House.  That novel is called Close Reach, and will be released on May 6, 2014.  I just dissed genre labels as a way of telling you about a book, but forget I said that.  Close Reach is a thriller.  A very dark thriller.  It’s set aboard a sailboat in the Drake Passage, between Antarctica and Chile.  Terrible things happen to my characters, and I am still apologizing to them for what they had to endure.  Some scenes in that novel were so hard to write, they followed me around for days afterwards. 

I also have a third novel, which is a murder mystery set in San Francisco.  My agent and I are discussing the ending to that book now, but I hope to have it fixed up and ready to go soon.  I’m confident a publisher will like it.

Erin: I can’t wait to read both of them!

Q:  How hard is it to find time to write creatively with your busy career schedule?

A:  It’s not too hard to write, even though my schedule keeps me very busy.  Hawaii has a nice saying: we stay on island time.  So although I’m busy, I don’t have it nearly as bad as my attorney-friends in New York.  I can usually write on the weekends, and when I’m really cranking on a book, I’ll write at night when I get home from the office.

Q:  Are you a person who uses an outline or are you a “pantser?” If you don’t know what I pantser is, it is a term some of us recently identified with since we “write by the seat of our pants.”

A:  I am a panster—or a shortster, since this is Hawaii and it’s always warm.  I have a hard time writing outlines for legal briefs, so I’d never be able to do one for a novel.

Q:  You live in a paradise in Hawaii. How does this help or hinder your writing career? I would imagine it would spur creativity, but with so much nature to enjoy it would hard to be so dedicated! Ha!

A:  Happiness and comfort are totally undervalued as artistic motivators.  For me, Hawaii is extremely comfortable, and I’m lucky.   There are a few breakfast spots in Waikiki where you can usually find me with a laptop on the weekends, and I’ll be having the time of my life.  Plus, the coffee here is fantastic.

Erin: Sounds so lovely….

Q:  What are your hopes for your writing career? Do you plan to write more crime novels in which you can utilize your investigative strengths?

A:  I’d like to write and publish a novel every year, if I can.  Though Redheads took thirteen months, my second and third novels took three months each.  Like I said, I can’t write from an outline, so for me, writing is really a matter of getting hit with a whole book at once and then trying to get it all down before I lose it.  A lot of great sculptors talked about the idea of not actually creating their works, but just uncovering them from the marble.  I’m not comparing my works to Italian masterpieces, but I do feel the same way about the process: the stories are already there, and my only job is to dig them up once I find them.  Finding them is sometimes hard, but once I kick around and know there’s something there, it’s just a matter of bringing it to the surface. 

But this is all a fancy way of saying: I have no freaking idea what I’m going to write next.

Erin: HA! But I bet your subconscious does, even if you don’t think so!

Q:  Have you ever thought about writing a different type of novel, or am I putting the cart before the horse so to speak?

A: My last answer probably addressed this.  But to reiterate, I’ll write anything if I think I can get it done, and if I love it.

Q: What do you like best about writing?

A:  The whole process is fun, except for the first ten pages.  I enjoy having a project to work on, and I love the research.

Q:  Do you have any advice for any aspiring or upcoming authors? What motivation or words of encouragement can you give?

A:  Yes, I do have a little.  The writing community is a lot more friendly and giving than I ever would have imagined.  If you are a budding writer, go ahead and start reaching out to writers you admire.  You’d be surprised how many of them will reach back, and how generous they can be with their thoughts, their time and their contacts.  There are some truly wonderful people out there.  I met my agent because I met an author I’d admired for a long time at KillerCon, in Las Vegas.  I’d gone to Vegas to meet Don D’Auria, after he’d agreed to acquire Redheads for Samhain.  But then I met Jack Ketchum, who read Redheads, liked it a lot, and put me in touch with his agent.  Things really started to fall into place after that.

I guess that was more ‘publishing advice’ than ‘writing advice.’  For writing advice, I’d just say this: read as widely as you can, and then sit down and write the novel you want to be reading—not the novel you think you should be writing.

Erin: I think you were extremely lucky to get Jack Ketchum on board your work!

Q:  Your favorite place for dinner or your favorite type of food?

A:  There is a sushi place in Waikiki called Chiba Ken.  They know me well there, and usually pour the Otokayama sake before I even sit down.  And their uni nigiri is delicious.

Erin: I have no idea what any of that even is!! Go ahead, laugh…

Q: What else do you enjoy doing besides writing?

A:  I love sailing.  Readers who buy Close Reach in May will probably pick up on that.  And in December, Maria and I are going to Tanzania to climb Mount Kilimanjaro.  That will be fun.  I also read a lot.  I just bought The Jack in the Green, by Frazer Lee, and I got books from Brian Pinkerton, W.D. Gagliani, Mick Ridgewell and Brian Moreland and this year’s KillerCon.

sail

Jonathan sailing!

Erin: That sounds like so much fun for Maria and you! I bet you find a story there! I like to read too, can you tell? I have Jack in the Green from Frazer too, and those other guys, well they are pretty wonderful too!

 Q:  I know you don’t have too much up online yet, but is there a way readers or fellow writers can contact you?

A:  I’m ashamed at how little I have online.  About six months ago, I hired a great website designer to build a site for me—I have the domain already: www.jonathanmoorefiction.com.  But I’m sure I’ve been the worst client this web designer has ever had.  He asks me to do stuff, and I just don’t do it.  He has been waiting for months for me to supply content, and patiently sends me an email and calls me every Monday morning.  At first I didn’t get him anything because I was finishing my most recent novel, and I could only think of that.  Then two of my cases started gearing up towards trial, and I just bought a new house and had to move…and….and I’m running out of excuses.  I need to get it done.  In the meantime, people can always find me on Facebook.  I’m friends with you, so if people see my post’s on you pages (Erin Al-Mehairi or Hook of a Book), they’ve got the right guy.

Erin: I’d say yes, probably should. Your book is going to be huge and people will want to connect with you and you’ll want to grow your fan base. If you need help, I’m raising my hand!

Q:  Where can your book be purchased?

A:  My book is available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, iTunes, and wherever ebooks are sold.  It is also available on the Samhain website, and can be ordered as a beautiful trade paperback, or in any electronic format.

Erin:  Thank you so much, Jonathan, for the wonderful boat ride.  I can smell the island flowers and feel the warmth of the sun in my hair. Almost makes me forget what a scary book you just published!! Kidding!  I had a great time discussing your book and your life with you. Hope to have you back in the future and best wishes your writing!

Jonathan: Thank you, Erin, for the chance to come here and talk. 

For a last comment—there is a scene in Redheads when two of the characters escape by boat to Haleolono harbor, on Molokai.  Here’s Pez Vela in that harbor:

sunset

Erin: BEAUTIFUL!!!

Redheads, Synopsis~

RedheadsA killer far worse than insane.

Chris Wilcox has been searching for years, so he knows a few things about his wife’s killer. Cheryl Wilcox wasn’t the first. All the victims were redheads. All eaten alive and left within a mile of the ocean. The trail of death crosses the globe and spans decades.

The cold trail catches fire when Chris and two other survivors find a trace of the killer’s DNA. By hiring a cutting-edge lab to sequence it, they make a terrifying discovery. The killer is far more dangerous than they ever guessed. And now they’re being hunted by their own prey.

Author Jonathan Moore, Biography~

JMJonathan Moore and his wife, Maria Wang, live in Hawaii. When he’s not writing, or fixing his boat, Jonathan is an attorney. Before completing law school in New Orleans, he was an English teacher, a whitewater raft guide on the Rio Grande, a counselor at a Texas wilderness camp for juvenile delinquents, and an investigator for a criminal defense attorney in Washington, D.C. He is working on getting his information up online!

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