Tag Archives: women in publishing

International Women’s Day: A Poem, A Word, A Pledge

A Step Forward

You hear our voices,
you say you stand with us,
but you should break down those walls,
and SEE us, in all our magnificence,
because we glow, yes we glow.

We are the passion of the universe,
contained within our hearts.

We are women.

– Erin Sweet Al-Mehairi, 2018



Found on the Internet for WallpaperSeries.com


It’s #InternationalWomensDay, or #IWD2018, and people around the world are rallying and protesting against gender inequality and sexual discrimination. I’ve been promoting this day for a decade, and this is the first one I’ve seen as much movement as I have in utilizing it as a catalyst for change not just awareness. I’m glad to see it happen. Women are amazing individuals with so much to offer the world. In theory, if things were fine, I wouldn’t even have to make that claim!

In essence, International Women’s Day is the marker to honor the Women’s Rights Movement and all those who came before us who were spit on, jailed, starved, ridiculed, and more as they fought for women to have the rights to vote, own land, have a bank account, and not be locked away in asylums. I’m glad to see women are taking ownership and heading back toward making progress again. In fact, the theme this year is #PressforProgress.

On my site here, you’ll find many great articles on women in history and making history, both on the page dedicated to that series, as March is also Women in History Month, but in interviews and book reviews as well. I’m currently taking articles about these women, so please contact me to send them in. I often interview and review books by women on this site and you’ll easily see that if you take a quick perusal through the archives.

Outside of publishing, I’ve spent decades fighting for women’s causes, from when I was news editor at my college paper and I fought against campus rape and it being reported, to when I was in healthcare and became the Young Careerist representative for Ohio at the national Business and Professional Women’s organization’s annual conference where I spoke about making strides for heart health in women. I’ve sat on a sub-committee for women’s health education, primarily in regards to those underprivileged, of the board of the Ohio Governor’s Office for Women’s Initiatives (a department and program that Republican Governor Kasich did away with when he took office) and assisted with statewide events to empower women. I’ve raised funds through events I’ve put on for women’s health, women’s shelters, and those battling cancer. Currently, I am the chair of the board at a local mental health center which also oversees our local rape crisis and domestic violence shelter.

In publishing, I advocate for women in certain genres, like horror, to have their voices heard and offer platforms for them to do so. In my writing, I fight against domestic violence, rape, assault, and confinement. My collection Breathe. Breathe., of poetry and short stories, in my story within the anthology Hardened Hearts, and even my poem in Enchanted Conversation magazine have all tackled these themes. On the site, on social media, and in articles, I share the life and times of historical writers, in several genres, because often they’ve also been involved in women’s liberation.

I still feel I don’t do enough. There is always more to do. I’ll keep doing it. I promise now I’ll get back to writing more essays so my own voice is heard. I’ll keep those women in history alive, those marginalized, those without a platform. I’ll keep serving those crying out in need and the disadvantaged. I’ll keep helping women out of domestic abuse situations.

And it’s not only women need to fight and showcase women, it’s men too. It’s going to take unity of both genders to make this work.

What will you do?



Found at Picsymag








Filed under Feature Articles, women in history

#HookonWIH: Curtis Interviews Lilyn, Site Founder of Sci-Fi & Scary!

Today in the #HookonWiHM series, the honcho at Cedar Hollow Horror Reviews, Curtis Freeman, interviews horror reader, blogger, and founder of the site Sci-fi & Scary, Lilyn George. This is the first in his three-part series on women blogging in the horror genre. I’m glad we are getting the word out about other women in horror in addition to all the amazing authors. It takes a community to make the genre shine! Lilyn is one of the nicest and yet most brutally honest people working in the genre and she’s always looking on improving her site even amid her already busy regular life. She’s also a great proofreader! I am really thankful myself for all Lilyn has done for me and my clients.

I had been taking interviews by men and women with women in horror, as well as guest articles, throughout the month of February, but I have quite a few still set to post and so I decided to take them all year long. You can find information on this at the bottom of the post. Take it away Curtis – thanks for a great interview with Lilyn!


CHHR: What was the first horror book you ever read?

SF&S: I haven’t a clue. Probably something Dean Koontz, though.

CHHR: What is the scariest book you ever read?

SF&S: Scott Sigler’s Infected, but for a specific reason. I experienced this as an audio book and would (as I normally do) put it on to listen to as I fell asleep. Well, I wasn’t quite aware of the fact that he was going to make great use of sound effects in the book. I’m used to traditional narration! Anyways, I woke up at like 3 AM one night with the book right next to my ear going “We’re hungry! We’re hungry!” in that overlap of discordant tones. Scared the hell out of me. And I had that happen a few times with this book. It should come with a disclaimer: “Don’t fall asleep listening to it, you don’t know what you’re going to wake up to!”

CHHR: When did you become a blogger? What made you want to blog about books?

SF&S: About 2.5 years ago. Basically, Mira Grant’s book Feed is what turned me on to blogging. Even now it shapes the way I look at things, and how I want to handle the site as a whole. I still love that first book.

CHHR: What annoys you the most with your blog?

SF&S: I can’t make it perfect. Annoys the feck outta me.

CHHR: Do you think there is a gender bias in horror fiction? Explain.

SF&S: In published writing? Hell, yes. Of course there is. However, I think there’s a whole lot of women out there with scary stories tucked away, begging to see the light of day.

CHHR: Do you think there is a gender bias in horror book blogging? Explain.

SF&S: Not that I’ve seen. I know a lot of authors review books as well, so I see a certain predominance of men there, but when it comes to straight up just reviewers? I can name more women horror book bloggers than I can men, so I think it equals out.

CHHR: How can we fix the bias?

SF&S: By doing away with the idea that horror books ‘aren’t real books’ and showing people that it’s okay to have a little fun on the dark side.

CHHR: I find it sad that we still live in a world where women authors have to use initials to seem less female. What are your thoughts?

SF&S: Until we eliminate the idea that the female sex is somehow not as capable as the male sex in certain areas, women are always going to have to be a little tricky to get ahead. I don’t have any particular thoughts as to the trees because I’m looking at the forest, you know?

CHHR: What pushes your buttons with your blog?

SF&S: Authors not reading the bloody review policy and making me waste my time reading the entry forms that I’m inevitably going to reject because they didn’t read the policy!

CHHR: Do you think the Horror Writers Association (HWA) should start recognizing horror book bloggers?

SF&S: Oh yeah, this is the group that Michael Hodges sometimes talks about, isn’t it? They don’t recognize book bloggers? Shame, that.

CHHR: How has the horror community treated you since starting your blog?

SF&S: I’ve met lots of lovely people, and feel treated quite nicely, thanks!

CHHR: What makes a good horror book?

SF&S: A properly edited and proofread manuscript that has been researched as much as possible, with a coherent plot, believable dialogue, and any elements a reader finds scary.

CHHR: What scares you?

SF&S: In life? My living child dying. Having lost one child already, nothing in fiction can compare to that shit. In fiction? Demons and demonic possession.

CHHR: Who’s your favorite horror author? You have to pick one or three authors, but it can’t be two.

SF&S: Bill Schweigart, Danielle DeVor, and William Meikle

CHHR: What books are you most looking forward to in 2018?

SF&S: Courtney Alameda’s Pitch Dark, Jeremy K. Brown’s Zero Limit, and Rob Boffard’s Adrift

SciFi and Scary bio photo

Lilyn George, Biography –

Lilyn George is the founder of the book and film reviews and news site Sci-Fi & Scary, which focuses on primarily independent works.  Insomniac, rabid reader, spoonie, and afflicted by PTSD.  Also, there’s the tentacle thing.

And thank you to Curtis from Cedar Hollow Reviews for his fantastic interview with Lilyn. What a great addition to the women in horror series.

Follow her Sci-fi and Scary site for Science Fiction, Horror, Comics, Film, and More!

Find Lilyn on Twitter too!

About Curtis Freeman-


Curtis is a lover of horror books and films and a passionate addition to the horror genre. He reviews at his site Cedar Hollow Reviews and has just begun to interview authors via his YouTube Channel. Curtis even grilled me for over 3 hours one evening. His heartfelt excitement for the genre shows. This is the first in a series of three women horror bloggers Curtis is interviewing for my #HookonWiHM project. You can also find Curtis on Twitter.

Watch for more to come in the #HookonWiHM series….

February was Women in Horror Month but we are honoring them all year! It’s time to celebrate and show off what we got! For those of you reading, men AND women both, make an effort to read and watch more horror produced by women this year.

For the #HookonWiH series, or Women in Horror at Hook of a Book, we’ll be hosting interviews conducted by men and women with other women in horror. Watch for those spread throughout the month, and if you want in, contact me! Find more info HERE.


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Filed under HookonWiHM, Q and A with Authors