Category Archives: poetry

#NationalPoetryMonth: A Poem by Nada Adel Sobhi – Poet, Writer, and Journalist

We’ve almost finished up National Poetry Month with the end of April in our sights, and also, my series this week for it. However, I’ve committed myself to including poetry highlights here at least one to two (or more) times a month ongoing as time permits. It’s been such a pleasure to host something I love here so much, poetry and poets!

Today, Nada Adel Sobhi is here with a poem that I just love. She wrote this over a year ago, and yet, if you know my own work and thoughts, it might seem almost as if she’s channeling my thoughts with her utilization of breathing, water, and women’s empowerment. This is what the universe does, which is fascinating. I’ve read this over several times, thinking about it – it’s so powerful!

Nada is from Egypt and manages the Nadaness in Motion blog as well as monthly writing prompt called “Takhayyal/Imagine,” which is how I first met her on Twitter when she read my own collection. Since then, we’ve become friends and are able to talk and share in the poetry and writing world together and I’m enjoying getting to know her. She’s an amazing strong individual with such talent.

Enjoy!

woman in water.jpg

Reawakening
by Nada Adel Sobhi

Feet on the scorching sand

I edge forward

Crystal clear blue water beckons me

I obey

Numbing-cold

But the glittering blue takes that away

My eyes open, but unseeing

My mind jumping between a million thoughts

The cold banishes them,

Send them to the back of my mind

They can linger there

Till they’re needed – if needed

The cold water calls me to the present

While the sun burns my head

I know what I must do

Instead,

I hesitate

My lower body acclimates to the water

Urging me forward

 

But,

I hesitate.

 

I close my eyes

Breathe in

And let go

 

I dive!

 

Cold drenches my sensitive, warm scalp

But I ignore it

Pushing forward

Till my lungs beg for breath,

For air

 

I rise,

Releasing my pent up air

 

And breathe

 

It’s different

I’m different

 

I feel it

 

I’m alive

 

Taking another breath

I go in again

 

Fish greet me as one of their own

 

How do they know?

 

The cold water caresses me

Driving away all the negativity,

Anxiety, worry, anger,

Frustration, pressure.

It draws them out

And drives them into the darkening depths,

Filling me with life, strength.

 

Rising from the water

My morning plans change.

I know what I want and need to do

Something I have long deserted,

Threw in the back of my mind

When it should have been at the forefront

 

Tonight

With nothing but the moon and stars to guide me

I’ll reawaken the magic,

The witch within.

______________

Nada Adel Sobhi, Biography –

 

Nada

Born in Cairo, Egypt, Nada Adel Sobhi is a poet, writer, book blogger, translator, journalist, and most importantly a lover of chocolate and all things paranormal.

Nada earned her BA in English Language and Literature from Cairo University in 2009. She was the editor of her department’s student poetry and creative writing magazine “The Muse” from 2006 till 2015, and the Editor-in-Chief of HR-focused HR Revolution Middle East e-zine.

Nada currently blogs about her writing, including poetry, book reviews, author interviews, and a monthly writing prompt called “Takhayyal/Imagine” on her Nadaness In Motion blog.

Nada’s poetry has been published in Scripting Change’s projects, “Beyond the Words” (2014) and “Breaking Free” (2016), the proceeds of which go to charity. Her poem “Remember” was published in Paragram’s poetry anthology under the same name in 2015.

Nada is also an editor and translator with over 6 years of experience with the language pairs English – Arabic – English. She is currently the managing editor of Mubasher.info’s English portal providing economic, financial, and stock market-related news for the Middle East.

Get in touch with Nada and stay up to date with the latest news on books, authors, and Takhayyal via Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and LinkedIn.

Twitter

Nadaness in Motion Facebook

Instagram

Nada on LinkedIn

And check out her wonderful Nadaness in Motion website!

Thank you, Nada!!

 

 

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#NationalPoetryMonth: A Poem by Author/Screenwriter Dustin LaValley

I’ve been celebrating National Poetry Month (April) all week long, trying to fit a splash in for poetry before the month ended. I’ve featured three amazing women of poetry so far, but today I have a poem for you by Dustin La Valley. Dustin writes books, stories, comics, and for the screen. His psychological thriller novella, The Deceived, has been optioned for film and his screen credits include award-winning short films and work for major networks.

He doesn’t really consider himself into writing poetry necessarily, though he likes to read it, but he’s a very good friend of mine, not to mention UBER talented, and as I read his work, or he offers me to read snippets of micro-fiction, sometimes micro-poetry, I can obviously see his ability to be a lyricist, a poet, and one of those writers, who like me, love word play, being unique, and throwing emotion into their work. The amazing person he is though, of course, he gave me a poem to feature! It really shines a light on the relationship between father and son, fond childhood memories, and in a good way, which is something we don’t showcase enough sometimes. Read it over several times and let it sink in for you.

Enjoy!

____________

And, Baseball with Dad

by Dustin LaValley

with the shop’s neon light
sizzling, flickering, fading,
he walks to his car

where he sits in the darkness
of the night and listens not to the radio,
not to the follies of drunken passersby,
but to memories of his father,
telling him to choke up on the bat
as he threw baseballs
over home plate

______________

Dustin LaValley, Biography –

Dusty

Dustin LaValley is an author, screenwriter, and comic book creator. His psychological thriller novella The Deceived, has been optioned for film, while several of his short stories have been adapted to short films by TYO Productions and Twisted Drive Pictures. July 2018 will see the release of his three novella collection, 12 Gauge: Songs from a Street Sweeper, from Sinister Grin Press. His limited edition hardcover comic book with illustrator Daniele Serra, BEETLES!, is now available from SST Publications.

LaValley and his work have been featured in/on PBS, NPR, Yahoo News, Decibel Magazine, Rue Morgue, and 3AM among others. He was unable to attend the black-tie gala to receive the 2009 SUNY Parnassus Award for Creative Writing, as he had a fight in New Hampshire the same night, where he brought home gold. His Professor was not impressed. His professional record is 3-0-0. He lives in the Adirondacks of New York, where he’s a practicing Sensei of Seito Shito Ryu karate, Okinawan jujutsu, and Judo.

12G_Front_001.jpg

12 Gauge: Songs from a Street Sweeper, Synopsis –

12 Gauge: Songs from A Street Sweeper includes three white-knuckled novellas.

Spinner

A prison escapee leads law enforcement on a chase through the Adirondack Mountains, where they encounter a reclusive elderly man with a dark secret.

H/armed

An ultra-violent satirical commentary on societal norms, cliques, and obedience.

The Deceived

A criminal pair invade the home of the wrong man on the wrong day.

Praise

“Spinner is a thriller, a horror story, and an adventure narrative. It’s also a lot of fast, bloody, violent fun.” – Gabino Iglesias, HorrorTalk

“LaValley creates a non-stop, adrenaline ride of violence and mayhem, in a setting Americans know all so well. H/armed is a bloody, relentless and visceral assault on the senses. Wickedly entertaining.” – Paul Hough, writer/director of The Human Race

The Deceived is equal parts thrilling, creepy, and downright brutal. A wonderful tale.” – Ronald Malfi, author of Bone White

Available July 1, 2018 from  Sinister Grin Press

Amazon

Also….he’s a comic book writer!

Beetles

BEETLES! is an homage to the classic horror and sci-fi “big-bug” films of the 1940s and 1950s, written by Dustin LaValley, illustrated by Daniele Serra, and released as a signed and numbered, limited edition hardcover from SST Publications. There are only 100 available, so act fast.

BEETLES! is available online from the publisher at https://sstpublications.co.uk/Beetles.html.

Thanks, Dustin!

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#NationalPoetryMonth: Poems by Linda D. Addison, Bram Stoker Award Winner

I’m continuing on today in my series for National Poetry Month (April) with some three wonderful poems, two of them never before published, from the amazing poet Linda D. Addison! Linda D. Addison is the award-winning author of four collections, the first African-American to receive the Horror Writers Association (HWA) Bram Stoker Award®, and recipient of the 2018 HWA Lifetime Achievement Award. I’m quite honored that she agreed to be part of this series and thrilled she’s offered two unpublished poems for release here at Oh, for the Hook of a Book! Not only talented, she’s always a bright light with an enormous smile and a kind word for all.

Enjoy!

The first poem was nominated for a 2018 Rhysling Award and was published as the Afterword in the HWA Bram Stoker finalist Sycorax’s Daughters anthology of horror fiction/poetry by African-American women.

Linda Addison cover Sycoraxs Daughters

Sycorax’s Daughters Unveiled

by Linda D. Addison

Descendants of the unseen,

born from uterus: bruised, abused, loved, rejected.

Alive, in spite of the promise of death,

giving birth even while silently weeping blood.

 

We paint red memories of our lives

before prison, on walls made from

our sweat, our anger, and the blood of

our children: unborn, reborn in mourning.

 

Descending from human to property,

turning to Nyavirezi, lion goddess, for hope,

for a way to survive each bitter breath,

to use the growing Shadows for transformation.

 

Finding truth in rivers, rain, tree roots,

flowers, herbs. Earth delivers healing &

a way for revenge, for freedom, even if

just surrendering to a cliff’s edge.

 

Ascending back to Self, the dream was

never deferred, but a tiny seed, carried

deep in tortured wombs, fed by near madness,

rising from ashes, rebuilt from courage.

 

As daughters of daughters,

we speak Our fables

from mouths full of lightning:

of mermaids, magic, demons, vampires,

journeys to hell and back, shape shifters,

ravished bodies & strengthened souls,

alternate futures, babies wanted & rejected,

firestarters, ghosts, and transhumans.

 

Revoking banishment,

read Our words & know:

We Are Here.

_________

This next one is a funky poem about writing.
It’s published here for the first time!

Notorious-BIG

How to be Notorious

By Linda D. Addison

Be like

Biggie Smalls

The Notorious B.I.G.

write loose and easy

flow dark and semi-autobiographical.

 

Tell your story

like junior M.A.F.I.A.

feud with the best

spend nine months in jail

just because you got

Business Instead of Game.

 

Start a band

with fiddles and banjos

play everything from jazz and blues

to rap and waltzes

keep your audience

guessing and confused.

 

You could be quoted

by shamans everywhere

because your imitation

of Notorious B.I.G.

is so dead on they suspect

reincarnation is involved.

 

Or you could

be yourself

unique and imperfect

kiss discretion good bye,

sing when others cry,

dance when they pray,

treat status quo

like the poison

it can be.

_________

This third poem was inspired by the movie “Life of Pi” and Linda changing everything in her life by moving from NYC to Tucson AZ. We are very lucky to publish it first here.

life-of-pi-1

My Life with the Tiger

By Linda D. Addison

My old life shipwrecked.

I am stranded in between.

The Tiger: imagined fear of the unknown future,

looking into the eyes of that wild animal:

“I am your vessel,” I say.

“Above all, don’t lose hope.”

 

I feed the creature,

we are connected,

finding an uneasy balance.

I look it in the eye,

my determination for life

stronger than fear.

 

And yet fear keeps me alive.

I plead with danger

“Come out and see God.”

In a relentless storm

“Why are you scaring me, God.

I have given Everything to You.”

We are tossed by Your storm.

 

Almost drowned I approach the Tiger,

my life, to revive it.

I lean the beast’s head on my lap.

When we finally land, barely alive,

on safe ground, my danger, my Tiger

walks into the jungle, its home,

without looking back.

 

And now more about Linda and her latest project….

Sycorax’s Daughters

Linda Addison cover Sycoraxs Daughters

edited with Kinitra Brooks, PhD & Susana Morris, PhD

ISBN-10: 1941958443; ISBN-13: 978-1941958445

Cedar Grove Publishing (March 2017)

33 authors; 28 stories, 14 poems

Cover by Jim Callahan HWA Bram Stoker award® 2017 finalist

Thought-provoking, powerful, and revealing, this anthology is composed of 28 dark stories and 14 poems written by African-American women writers. The tales of what scares, threatens, and shocks them will enlighten and entertain readers. The works delve into demons and shape-shifters from “How to Speak to the Bogeyman” and “Tree of the Forest Seven Bells Turns the World Round Midnight” to far future offerings such as “The Malady of Need”. These pieces cover vampires, ghosts, and mermaids, as well as the unexpected price paid by women struggling for freedom and validation in the past.

Linda D. Addison, Biography –

2017 LindaAddison closeup selfieLinda D. Addison is the award-winning author of four collections, the first African-American to receive the HWA Bram Stoker Award®, and recipient of the 2018 HWA Lifetime Achievement Award. She has published over 300 poems, stories and articles and is a member of CITH, HWA, SFWA and SFPA.

Addison is one of the editors of Sycorax’s Daughters (Cedar Grove Publishing), a Bram Stoker finalist anthology of horror by African-American women. Catch her latest work in anthologies Cosmic Underground (Cedar Grove Publishing), Scary Out There (Simon Schuster) and Into Painfreak (Necro Publications).

Links –

Website

Amazon page

Twitter

Thank you, Linda

 

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#NationalPoetryMonth: Five Ways Poetry Can Strengthen Your Prose by Sara Tantlinger

In celebration of National Poetry Month this April, I’m doing a small series featuring poets/poetry. Yesterday, Christina Sng stopped by and shared three of her fabulous poems! Today, Sara Tantlinger is here to discuss how poetry can help strengthen your prose writing.

I really appreciate her offering this piece, because I can’t believe how often I tell other writers that poetry, if not read for enjoyment, at the least, can be a great asset in blossoming lengthier writing. It brings me great pleasure to know that other poets out there feel the same and that she, as well, plays with words and poetry to assist with things such as character development. I’ve only met Sara online this year, but she’s a wonderful and talented human being and I’ve enjoyed getting to know her. I am super excited for her next release later this year, which is a collection of poems inspired by H.H. Holmes (you all KNOW I love me some serial killer anything).

And now, take the advice of this informative, mentoring post! Will you try poetry today?

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5 Ways Poetry Can Strengthen Your Prose

by Sara Tantlinger, author of Love for Slaughter

1) Let’s talk about purple prose vs. poetic prose. Purple prose is a term most often used to describe exposition that is “too much” in some way. Perhaps it is dripping with adverbs or excessive adjectives, or maybe the language superfluously describes a tree for two pages. Writing is such a stylistic and subjective field that what is “purple” can be difficult to pinpoint.

For example, the following would most likely be considered purple prose:

“The summer day was bright and warm; the sun beat down with scorching rays, heating the river up to a sizzling temperature. Occasionally, a gust of wind would blow violently through the trees, shaking the sun-soaked leaves onto the rippling water’s surface below.”

Okay, we get it. The day is warm, the sun is bright, the wind is blowing. Let’s boil this down into something more concise but keep the language strong. After all, poetry itself is all about how to say a lot with a little, how to wield language as a powerful tool. It only makes sense that this should translate well into prose.

“The sun beat down with scorching rays, heating the river despite the occasional gust of wind. Speckled leaves from the surrounding woods broke free and cascaded onto the rippling water.”

The description of the sun is enough to let our readers assume it is summer without being told. The descriptions of the heat and wind have been significantly reduced to something more concise, but the meaning is just as clear. The language paints a strong image but does not use superfluous or repetitive descriptions to achieve that objective. The more you write, read, or study poetry, the more natural and easier it becomes to spot these repetitions or “purple” bits in your exposition, thus allowing you to tighten up your prose while keeping it poetic in description.

2) Poetry is meant to be read aloud. Hearing the words better allows you to listen to the rhythm and cadence, to feel the way each word forms in your mouth. Poetry is something to be savored and tasted, and prose should be the same.

As with the above example, concision and strong imagery are the building blocks for poetry. Practicing this in prose can significantly empower the exposition. Adding cadence into the mix can strengthen those descriptions too, but I do caution not to overuse this in prose since it could potentially exhaust the reader if you’re writing like the lovechild of Nathaniel Hawthorne and James Joyce (though I love them both). So, read your prose aloud. Hear it, find the rhythm in the words that make each sentence something wicked or gorgeous or both.

3) Poetry can help immensely with sentence length, sentence variety, and the use of punctuation. With poetry, every punctuation mark, every line break or stanza shift is significant and purposeful. E.E. Cumming’s “Buffalo Bill’s” piece is one of my favorite examples of how to play with spacing. Obviously, most prose isn’t going to do quite that unless you’re getting very experimental, but writing poetry can strengthen your sense of how powerful punctuation, pauses, paragraph breaks, and other structural elements are.

4) One of my favorite exercises is to write a poem from the point of view of different characters when I’m writing prose and feeling stuck with a character. Would your protagonist and antagonist write the same poem if they were forced to write poetry? Probably not, but maybe they would. Maybe they’re more similar than you thought. Maybe they enjoy writing poetry!

Playing around with things like this is a great way to get to know your characters better. It can also help to write a poem about a particular scene or setting to help get the language flowing and translate it into prose later.

5) And finally, poetry is one of our oldest associations to human emotion and is strongly connected with traditions of oral history. Being a verbal art, it was sung and recited, made into chants and hymns to help pass on important stories and information. From Greek epics to contemporary slam poetry, the evolution of words has continued to impact us deeply. Whether the poem is beautiful, haunting, romantic, frightening or something else, poetry has a way of reminding us how much we may have in common with a stranger, of how art itself can break down barriers.

The lessons poetry teaches us about the range of human emotion and the amazing power of words is something we can all continuously learn from, for both our writing and for our mission to live fulfilling lives.

Sara Tantlinger, Biography –

Sara Tantlinger

Sara Tantlinger resides outside of Pittsburgh on a hill in the woods. She is the author of the dark poetry collection Love For Slaughter, and her next collection, The Devil’s Dreamland: Poetry inspired by H.H. Holmes will be out later in 2018.

She is a contributing editor for The Oddville Press, a graduate of Seton Hill’s MFA program, a member of the SFPA, and an active member of the HWA. She embraces all things strange and can be found lurking in graveyards or on Twitter @SaraJane524 and at her website.

Love for Slaughter, Synopsis –

LFS

This debut collection of poetry from Sara Tantlinger takes a dark look at all the horrors of love, the pleasures of flesh, and the lust for blood. For discerning fans of romance and the macabre, look no further than Love For Slaughter.

Amazon Link

LFS back

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#NationalPoetryMonth: Poems from Christina Sng, Bram Stoker Award Winner

April is National Poetry Month, and though I’ve been behind on getting many posts up about it, I’m hustling and featuring several poets I know and love from the dark fiction/horror/fantasy/sci-fi genres this week. I’d want to thank the authors that agreed to hustle with me in order to be able to offer this small April series to readers. In the future, I plan to hopefully feature poetry here, beyond my own, at least one or two times a month as a special project.

One of those amazing ladies I adore for her positive spirit, her friendship, her talent, is Christina Sng! She’s a ray of sunshine to me every day and her creativity in both art and writing inspires me. Christina won a 2017 Bram Stoker Award® this year for her collection, A Collection of Nightmares from Raw Dog Screaming Press. She’s garnered more than 70 awards and nominations, including the Elgin, Rhysling, and the 2018 Jane Reichhold International Prize.

I’m very honored and excited that Christina chose to feature three of her 2018 Rhysling Award poems here on my site! They span various genres of science fiction and horror and were first published in various magazines as noted below. I hope you’ll love Christina’s work as much as I do. My favorite here is the one about Little Red Riding Hood.

And it was World Book Day yesterday as well, and Sng, lives in Singapore!

Enjoy….

starlight

STARLIGHT

It was far too early
When I woke this morning.
Starlight glimmered
In the sky like fireflies.

Yet the clock read ten
Despite the blanket of night,
Flung over the moon’s smile,
Leaving no crack of light.

That was when the news arrived.
The sun had just died.
We had but eight minutes
Before the Earth turned to ice.

— Christina Sng

Previously in Space and Time #129

playground-drawing-night-moon-rocket-buildings-hd-720P-wallpaper-middle-size

MOONLIGHT IN THE PLAYGROUND

We wander the quiet playground
Hand-in-hand, chain-linked
And bound, blood thick within blood.

The moon is ivory rich tonight,
Shrouded by grey cotton wool clouds
Casting a soft filter on the foggy night.

My little girl softly hums
A bedtime melody about
Dragons and warrior children.

We pass by elephant swings
And an octopus roundabout,
And then she spies it,

Lets go of my hand,
Racing lightspeed toward it,
The dragon of her dreams:

Spiral loops wound in the air;
Musical notes crescendoing
Into a grand finale–

A dragon-headed slide, where
The little one now glides down,
Laughing with sheer joy,

My sweet soprano;
The high notes on
A child’s piano.

My boy is swinging
Upside down from
One of the spirals;

My bass clef, arms now
Outstretched, reminding me
Of those dexterous acrobats

We saw on television last week.
When did he let go
Of my hand to go play?

My focus has lost its razor
These days. Perhaps it is truly
Time to rest and hibernate.

The clouds yawn, puffing apart
To reveal a luminously silver moon.
She brightens up the entire night sky.

I call to them softly, kiss
Their disappointed cheeks,
Remind them that

Even the best orchestras
Need to end; and all living
Things need to sleep.

They nod in acquiescence,
Pondering now what wondrous
Adventures their dreams will bring.

And so I begin to sing,
An old melody my mother
Taught me as a child.

I hold their hands tight,
Feel our shared blood
Pulse between us.

Slowly we fade to star dust,
Drifting back into the skies,
Into the mysterious universe

Where we belong.

–Christina Sng
Previously in Spectral Realms #6
little-red-riding-hood-illustration_00436387.jpg
LITTLE REDLittle Red,
Motherless babe,
Taught to be self-sufficient
And brave at a young age.She gathered fruit,
Hunted squirrel, trained herself
To be a sharpshooter
With the wooden crossbow she made.

Werewolves in the forest,
The local rumors howled.
Little Red was unperturbed.
She had no fear at all.

She’d fought off snakes,
Outrun grizzlies,
Shot alligators
While spearing fishes.

“But this is new,” her ill Gran said,
“This is a cross between a wolf and a man.
He’s wily, wicked, and dangerous too.
I worry he might outsmart you.”

“Fear not, dear Gran,” Little Red said.
“I’ll fetch the doctor. Go back to bed.
My aim is true. If he causes trouble,
I’ll take care of it.”

Through the woods she walked,
Eyes ever watchful,
This fragile little girl,
Cloaked in a velvet red hood.

Predators stayed away,
Fearful of Little Red’s spear.
Only the new ones in the wood
Dared to venture near.

A soft woosh betrayed his presence.
Little Red sent two shots his way.
A yowl of pain from the south.
Little Red sent four more that way.

Out leapt the werewolf,
Dripping blood like bread crumbs.
That furry crazy-eyed wolf thing,
At Little Red he lunged.

She stepped artfully aside,
Shot him another two times:
Once in the head,
Once in his eye.

Another two for posterity,
And he was down
Splayed and drunk
Like a sheep skin rug.

Little Red rushed home,
Doc in tow.
Gran was sitting up,
Unnaturally flushed.

Her smile revealed
Stalactites in the snow.
She tore the good Doc in two
Without so much as a hello.

Little Red stared in dismay.
For the first time, she could not aim.
Scarecrow-still, she watched
Gran turn, face elongating,

Arms sprouting fur, like
Seedlings in slow-motion.
Gran’s nails and teeth
Grew like rabid weeds.

In her eyes,
A familiar crazed expression but
None of the love nor recognition
Little Red used to see inside.

She swung her new talons
At Little Red’s head, unfroze her
With the knowledge
That this was no longer Gran.

Gran would never
Raise her hand
At her beloved granddaughter.
This was truly some other monster.

Twin head shots
Dispatched that alien thing.
Little Red wept with sadness and rage
As she carried Gran’s body for burying.

Now marked
A new era for Little Red.
It was time to grow up;
Time to hunt predators instead.

– Christina Sng

Previously in Polu Texni, September 2017

And here is Christina’s latest collection from Raw Dog Screaming Press, the Bram Stoker Award® winning A Collection of Nightmares…..read all about it below…
CONStoker.png
A Collection of Nightmares
By Christina Sng
ISBN-10: 1935738984
ISBN-13: 978-1935738985
Raw Dog Screaming Press, July 2017
92 pages
Bram Stoker Award® Winner, Elgin Award nominee, and one of LitReactor’s Best Books of 2017, A COLLECTION OF NIGHTMARES takes us through a surreal dreamscape of seasonal creatures, bone carvers, listless gods, vengeful angels, and post-apocalyptic survivors, to the end of all things good and evil.
Christina

Christina Sng, Biography – 

Christina Sng is an award-winning poet, writer, and artist. Her work has been published in numerous print and online venues worldwide and garnered more than 70 awards and nominations, including the 2018 Jane Reichhold International Prize. She is the author of A CONSTELLATION OF SONGS, CATKU, Elgin Award nominees AN ASSORTMENT OF SKY THINGS and ASTROPOETRY, and 2017 Bram Stoker Award® Winner A COLLECTION OF NIGHTMARES. Visit her at www.christinasng.com.

Photo: Art pulled from various free wallpaper sites.

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